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If you have three states you can use if elseif and else to show your dynamic page with three options. Like below

if($user == 1){
  // put code here for first state
}elseif($user == 2){
  // put code here for 2nd state
}else{
  // Put code here for default state
}

But I have 5 states like this. How can I use them to make my page dynamic i.e. $user == 1, $user == 2, $user == 3, $user == 4 and default (I want to show default to everyone except $user == *)

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closed as not constructive by Stony, obi NullPoiиteя kenobi, hakre, andrewsi, Graviton Jun 24 '13 at 3:59

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3  
You can have as many else if statements as you want. From the documentation: "There may be several elseifs within the same if statement." –  Felix Kling Jun 22 '13 at 11:31
1  
You are doing it right. The last "else" will show default to everyone except $user == * –  Nikola R. Jun 22 '13 at 11:31
2  
Use a switch its much easier. –  Stony Jun 22 '13 at 11:32
    
wow, so many duplicate answers haha –  dayuloli Jun 22 '13 at 11:34
1  
The assumptions are wrong, asking a question without assumption would be more appropriate. –  Hashem Qolami Jun 22 '13 at 11:37

4 Answers 4

Have you heard about the switch statement? :)

switch($user) {
    case 1:
        // Do something
        break;
    case 2:
        // Do something
        break;
    case 3:
        // Do something
        break;
    case 4:
        // Do something
        break;
    case 5:
        // Do something
        break;
    default:
        // Do something
        break;
}

Note that in this case the numbers after the case keywords might look like syntax, or convention or whatever. They're not. Those are actually the values you compare $user with. So there could also be a case 'this is a string':, which would be executed if the value of $user was the string 'this is a string'.

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Heard about this but will it work for codes. Can I add codes in place of // do something –  mwaseema Jun 23 '13 at 7:49

Don't use the switch statement.

Obviously you have a more complicated construction. It isn't binary "true/false", it isn't ternary "true/false/null or unset".

Use a map, a lookup array, and/or polymorphism. Do prevent using a growing list of switch cases that cannot be maintained at some point.

Example

Lookup array

$usermap = array(
    1 => array('data for user 1'),
    2 => array('data for user 2'),
);

if (isset($usermap[$userid])) {
    // do something with $usermap[$userid]
} else {
    // default case
}

Benefit: All your user specific data is inside an array. You only have two code cases: Special case for a known user, and default case for everyone else. The code for special and general case has to be written only once.

Drawback: The special case code does the same for all special users, only the data is different.

In general, many times you can prevent using a switch by applying such a mapping array. Remember that such an array can come out of a database and thus be changed dynamically, while the code inside a switch statement is completely static - changing it requires a coder.

Code lookup with lambda functions

If you need some code to be different, you can store it in variables as well (works since PHP 5.3):

$usermap = array(
    1 => array('code' => function() { return 1+1; } ),
    2 => array('code' => function() { return 2*3; } ),
);

if (isset($usermap[$userid])) {
    $stuff = $usermap[$userid]['code'](); // execute the function
} else {
    $stuff = 0; // default
}

That way you can alter the code in some ways that gets executed. Be careful though, this can get way more complicated that a simple switch statement if you put too much logic inside the lambda functions in the array.

The better solution for this would be to use

Polymorphic objects

This is kind of basic OOP stuff: You have the general behaviour for a user written into an object, and special cases extend this general case and change some things.

class User {
    public function getFoo() {
        return 0;
    }
}

class SpecialUser1 extends User {
    public function getFoo() {
        return 1+1;
    }
}

class SpecialUser2 extends User {
    public function getFoo() {
        return 2*3;
    }
}

$usermap = array(
    1 => array('SpecialUser1'),
    2 => array('SpecialUser2'),
);

if (isset($usermap[$userid])) {
    $user = new $usermap[$userid](); 
} else {
    $user = new User;
}

$user->getFoo(); // Different result depending on the user id

So there are plenty of ways to prevent using switch. And why? Because switch adds a lot of complexity to the code in a concentrated spot. And that is considered a bad thing. Complexity cannot be avoided, it is a necessary byproduct of creating software. But the real challenge is to prevent complexity to accumulate and concentrate. It is almost always better to spread complexity across some layers.

So knowing which things to avoid (like switch), and how to achieve the same with less complexity, is essential for a good coder.

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Thanks it helped... –  mwaseema Jun 23 '13 at 7:50

use switch , http://php.net/manual/en/control-structures.switch.php

switch($user)
{
   case "1": /*your code */ break;
   case "2": .... break;
   case "3": .... break;
   default: ....
}
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switch ($user) {
    case 1:
        // put code here for 1st state
        break;
    case 2:
        // put code here for 2nd state
        break;
    case 3:
        // put code here for 3rd state
        break;
    default:
        // put code here for default state
        break;
}
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