Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why would my Python plot reflect across the y = 0.5 line? The same plot in Mathematica doesn't. I checked the equations 5-10 times and I don't see a difference. If I put a -1 in front of the python plot it will flip over and drop down 1 unit to y = -0.5.

Additionally, the definitions for alphag and betag are correct.

import numpy as np
import pylab

r1 = 1  #  AU Earth                                                                 
r2 = 1.524  #  AU Mars                                                              
deltanu = 75 * np.pi / 180  #  angle in radians                                     
mu = 38.86984154054163                                        

c = np.sqrt(r1 ** 2 + r2 ** 2 - 2 * r1 * r2 * np.cos(deltanu))

s = (r1 + r2 + c) / 2

am = s / 2


def g(a):
    alphag = 2* np.pi - 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a)))
    betag = -2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt((s - c) / (2 * a)))
    return (np.sqrt(a ** 3 / mu)
            * (alphag - betag - (np.sin(alphag) - np.sin(betag)))
            - dt)


a = np.linspace(am, 2, 500000)
dt = np.linspace(0, 2, 500000)

fig = pylab.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.plot(a, g(a), color = 'r')
pylab.xlim((0.9, 2))
pylab.ylim((0, 2))

pylab.show()

Python:

enter image description here

Edit 2:

There are actually 2 plots I am plotting and thanks to the comments, I noticed that there is something even stranger occurring.

The two plots I am plotting are:

dt = np.sqrt(a ** 3 / mu) * (alpha - beta - (sin(alpha) - sin(beta)))

where alpha is 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a))) or 2 * np.pi - 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a))) and beta is 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt((s - c) / (2 * a))) or the negative of the first.

In[13]:= r1 = 1;
r2 = 1.524;
dnu = 75 Degree;
mu = 38.86984154054163;

In[17]:= c = Sqrt[r1^2 + r2^2 - 2*r1*r2*Cos[dnu]]

Out[17]= 1.59176

In[18]:= s = (r1 + r2 + c)/2

Out[18]= 2.05788

In[19]:= alp = 2 \[Pi] - 2*ArcSin[Sqrt[s/(2*a)]];
bet = -2*ArcSin[Sqrt[(s - c)/(2*a)]];

In[22]:= Plot[
 Sqrt[a^3/mu]*(alp - bet - (Sin[alp] - Sin[bet])), {a, 0, 2}, 
 PlotRange -> {{.8, 2}, {0, 2}}]

This produces:

enter image description here

and

alp2 = 2*ArcSin[Sqrt[s/(2*a)]];
bet2 = 2*ArcSin[Sqrt[(s - c)/(2*a)]];

Plot[Sqrt[a^3/mu]*(alp2 - bet2 - (Sin[alp2] - Sin[bet2])), {a, 0, 2}, 
 PlotRange -> {{.8, 2}, {0, 2}}]

enter image description here

So the Python code matches the first Mathematica code but the plots the second picture and my python code for the the second Mathematica codes produces the flipped image for the first Mathematica picture.

share|improve this question
    
Where is the equivalent of dt in the Mathematica plot? –  unutbu Jun 22 '13 at 12:26
    
@unutbu in Mathematica, that is just y. We don't have to set it equal to zero by subtracting dt as we do in Python. –  dustin Jun 22 '13 at 12:27
    
Please post the full Mathematica code. –  unutbu Jun 22 '13 at 12:36
    
@unutbu OP updated. –  dustin Jun 22 '13 at 12:53
    
I'm not familiar with matplotlib, but does it somehow iterate over the dt that's buried in the function? –  agentp Jun 22 '13 at 13:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you simply have to remove the -dt from the Python code:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

r1 = 1  #  AU Earth                                                                 
r2 = 1.524  #  AU Mars                                                              
deltanu = 75 * np.pi / 180  #  angle in radians                                     
mu = 38.86984154054163                                        

c = np.sqrt(r1 ** 2 + r2 ** 2 - 2 * r1 * r2 * np.cos(deltanu))

s = (r1 + r2 + c) / 2

am = s / 2


def g(a):
    alphag = 2 * np.pi - 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a)))
    betag = -2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt((s - c) / (2 * a)))
    return (np.sqrt(a ** 3 / mu)
            * (alphag - betag - (np.sin(alphag) - np.sin(betag))))

def g2(a):
    alphag = 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a)))
    betag = 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt((s - c) / (2 * a)))
    return (np.sqrt(a ** 3 / mu)
            * (alphag - betag - (np.sin(alphag) - np.sin(betag))))


a = np.linspace(am, 2, 500000)
dt = np.linspace(0, 2, 500000)

fig, ax = plt.subplots(ncols=2)
ax[0].plot(a, g(a), color = 'r')
ax[1].plot(a, g2(a), color = 'r')
ax[0].set_xlim((0.9, 2))
ax[0].set_ylim((0, 2))
ax[1].set_xlim((0.9, 2))
ax[1].set_ylim((0, 2))

plt.show()

yields

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
I should have mentioned that in mathematica they are defined with a negative and in python I used the odd functionality of sine to move them out. –  dustin Jun 22 '13 at 12:23
    
I always thought with Python that I needed to set the plotted equations to 0 so subtracting over the LHS? With my other plots, this worked. Do you know why this wasn't the case in this instance? –  dustin Jun 22 '13 at 13:33
    
Banish that thought. Matplotlib's plot function simply plots the data given to it. Of course, it depends on what function you are using, plt.contour(x, y, f, [0]) does plot the level curve where f=0... –  unutbu Jun 22 '13 at 14:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.