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I have my own implementation of strtol and it works correctly i think. It looks as below:

long strtol(const char *nPtr, char **endPtr, int base)
{
  const char *start;
  int number;
  long int sum = 0;
  int sign = 1;
  const char *pos = nPtr;
  if (*pos == '\0')
    return 0;
  start = pos;
  while (isspace(*pos))
  {
    ++pos;
  }
  if (*pos == '-')
  {
    sign = -1;
    ++pos;
  }
  if (*pos == '+')
    ++pos;
  if (base == 16 || base == 8)
  {
    if (base == 16 && *pos == '0')
      ++pos;
    if (base == 16 && (*pos == 'x' || *pos == 'X'))
      ++pos;
    if (base == 8 && *pos == '0')
      ++pos;
  }
  if (base == 0)
  {
    base = 10;
    if (*pos == '0')
    {
      base = 8;
      ++pos;
      if (*pos == 'x' || *pos == 'X')
      {
        base = 16;
        ++pos;
      }
    }
  }
  if ((base < 2 || base > 36) && base != 0)
  {
    errno = EINVAL;
    return 0;
  }

  while (*pos != '\0')
  {
    number = -1;
    if ((int) *pos >= 48 && (int) *pos <= 57)
    {
      number = (int) *pos - 48;
    }
    if (isalpha(*pos))
    {
      number = (int) toupper(*pos) - 55;
    }

    if (number < base && number != -1)
    {
      if (sign == -1)
      {
        if (sum >= ((LONG_MIN + number) / base))
          sum = sum * base - number;
        else
        {
          errno = ERANGE;
          sum = LONG_MIN;
        }
      }
      else
      {
        if (sum <= ((LONG_MAX - number) / base))
          sum = sum * base + number;
        else
        {
          errno = ERANGE;
          sum = LONG_MAX;
        }
      }
    }
    else if (base == 16 && number > base
        && (*(pos - 1) == 'x' || *(pos - 1) == 'X'))
    {
      --pos;
      break;
    }
    else
      break;

    ++pos;
  }

  if (!isdigit(*(pos - 1)) && !isalpha(*(pos - 1)))
    pos = start;

  if (endPtr)
    *endPtr = (char*) pos;
  return sum;
}

However I have a question about last line :

*endPtr = (char*)pos;

Why do i have to cast pos to (char), endPtr and pos are both pointers to char, in other case the warning will say that : Assignment makes pointer from integer without cast. Thanks for help

share|improve this question
2  
*endPtr = char*, pos = const char* not same type really. – The Mask Jun 22 '13 at 13:31
    
A lot of the standard C library functions have broken signatures. A side effect of string literals being of type char* instead of const char*. Too late to fix that. – Hans Passant Jun 22 '13 at 13:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because they aren't of same type.

*endPtr is char* type

pos is const char* type.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks a lot ;) – user2511527 Jun 22 '13 at 14:17
    
@user2511527: If you are happy really,don't forget to accept the answer :) – The Mask Jun 22 '13 at 15:08

endPtr and pos are both pointers to char

This is false. pos is defined as

const char *pos= nPtr;

And endPtr as

char **endPtr
share|improve this answer

As pointed out by others because const char * pis not the same as char * p.

However, if you'd change the function's signature to be:

long strtol (const char * nPtr, const char ** endPtr, int base);

the cast would not be necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes , you are right after changing *endPtr = pos; Is correct. – user2511527 Jun 22 '13 at 15:58

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