Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
namespace GameForge
{
    namespace Core
    {
        class CTribool;
    }
}

GameForge::Core::CTribool operator ! ( const GameForge::Core::CTribool& rkTribool );

namespace GameForge
{
    namespace Core
    {
        class CTribool
        {
            friend CTribool operator ! ( const CTribool& rkTribool );

        private:
            EState m_eState;
        };
    }
}


GameForge::Core::CTribool operator ! ( const GameForge::Core::CTribool& rkTribool )
{
    switch( rkTribool.m_eState )
        {
    // Some stuff...

Does not compile because m_eState is not accessible within the last definition. The reason is that the friend declaration occurs in the CTribool namespace and thus declares a different function. So i tried to use scope resolution operator as follow.

friend CTribool ::operator ! ( const CTribool& rkTribool );

and

friend CTribool ::( operator ! ) ( const CTribool& rkTribool );

But that doesn't work either because somehow CTribool is not recognized as a valid type. I suspect that the forward declaration is not enough in this case. Any work around ?

share|improve this question
1  
It's not that CTribool is not recognized as a valid type. When you're using a qualified name in a friend declaration, you must refer to something that is already declared. –  Angew Jun 22 '13 at 14:06
    
Is there any way to achieve what i'm trying to do ? I mean there is some kind of circular dependency then ( CTribool operators -> CTribool -> friendship to operators ). –  Adrian Goudard Jun 22 '13 at 14:09
    
Don’t use C as a prefix for classes, it’s never been appropriate and was based purely on a misunderstanding of the MFC naming conventions. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 22 '13 at 14:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Strangely enough, you need to do this:

        friend CTribool (::operator !) ( const CTribool& rkTribool );

You need to specify that your function is in global scope, but without the parentheses, your :: would bind with CTribool, as if you were doing this:

        friend (CTribool::operator !) ( const CTribool& rkTribool );

in which case it would think you were specifying a function without a return type.

share|improve this answer

You should define your operator in the same namespace as you define the CTribool class. It's the right way to do it; it will be found during application by ADL:

namespace GameForge
{
    namespace Core
    {
        class CTribool
        {
            friend CTribool operator ! ( const CTribool& rkTribool );

        private:
            EState m_eState;
        };
    }
}



namespace GameForge
{
    namespace Core
    {
        CTribool operator ! ( const GameForge::Core::CTribool& rkTribool )
        {
            switch( rkTribool.m_eState )
                {
                // Some stuff...
                }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.