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How can I connect two plots at a discontinues point? I have an equation for the point of discontinuity.

import numpy as np
import pylab

r1 = 1  #  AU Earth                                                                 
r2 = 1.524  #  AU Mars                                                              
deltanu = 75 * np.pi / 180  #  angle in radians                                     
mu = 38.86984154054163

c = np.sqrt(r1 ** 2 + r2 ** 2 - 2 * r1 * r2 * np.cos(deltanu))

s = (r1 + r2 + c) / 2

am = s / 2


def f(a):
    alpha = 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a)))
    beta = 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt((s - c) / (2 * a)))
    return (np.sqrt(a **3 / mu) * (alpha - beta - (np.sin(alpha)
                                                      - np.sin(beta))))


def g(a):
    alphag = 2* np.pi - 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a)))
    betag = -2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt((s - c) / (2 * a)))
    return (np.sqrt(a ** 3 / mu)
            * (alphag - betag - (np.sin(alphag) - np.sin(betag))))


a = np.linspace(am, 2, 500000)

fig = pylab.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.plot(a, f(a), color = '#000000')
ax.plot(a, g(a), color = '#000000')
pylab.xlim((0.9, 2))
pylab.ylim((0, 2))

pylab.show()

enter image description here

The equation that reflects the point is: dt = np.sqrt(s ** 3 / 8) * (np.pi - betam + np.sin(betam)) where betam = 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(1 - c / s)) so dt = 0.5 at a = s / 2. However, the gap between the plots looks bigger than a point.

I added: ax.plot([am, am], [.505, .55], color = '#000000') which fills in the gap but it feels out of place.

enter image description here

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Are you sure that your g function is defined correctly? I find that g(am)==0.551860976346, which is not the same as f(am)==0.5. –  esmit Jun 24 '13 at 16:13
    
@esmit according to the book it is. I have re-checked all the equations numerous times. –  dustin Jun 24 '13 at 16:17
    
Have you rederived the equations yourself? The book could be wrong. What is the physical meaning of the discontinuity? –  esmit Jun 24 '13 at 21:38
    
@esmit that is where the the time of transfer is the minimum energy transfer. –  dustin Jun 24 '13 at 22:06
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems as though perhaps you should only be using one value for betag:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

r1 = 1  #  AU Earth                                                                 
r2 = 1.524  #  AU Mars                                                              
deltanu = 75 * np.pi / 180  #  angle in radians                                     
mu = 38.86984154054163                                        
c = np.sqrt(r1 ** 2 + r2 ** 2 - 2 * r1 * r2 * np.cos(deltanu))
s = (r1 + r2 + c) / 2
am = s / 2

def g(a, alphag, betag):
    return (np.sqrt(a ** 3 / mu)
            * (alphag - betag - (np.sin(alphag) - np.sin(betag))))

a = np.linspace(am, 2, 500000)

fig, ax = plt.subplots()

alphag = 2 * np.pi - 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a)))
betag = 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt((s - c) / (2 * a)))
ax.plot(a, g(a, alphag, betag), color = 'r')
alphag = 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a)))
ax.plot(a, g(a, alphag, betag), color = 'r')

plt.show()

yields

enter image description here

I really don't know what's going on here; I found this serendipitously.

share|improve this answer
    
These formulas are based on transfer times in orbital mechanics. betag is only when the angle is greater than 180 but less than 360. –  dustin Jun 22 '13 at 15:01
    
It is great that it works but I believe we should be able to achieve the result with the three equations too. Well at least that is what the book has led me to believe. –  dustin Jun 22 '13 at 15:04
    
If you overlay the two plots, this plot bottom portion is higher than the original plot. –  dustin Jun 22 '13 at 19:00
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ax.plot([am,am],[f(am),g(am)],color== '#000000')

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So I set beta and betag equal which did the trick. It was supposed to be negative betag but that didn't work.

def g(a):
    alphag = 2* np.pi - 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a)))
    betag = 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt((s - c) / (2 * a)))
    return (np.sqrt(a ** 3 / mu)
            * (alphag - betag - (np.sin(alphag) - np.sin(betag))))


def f(a):
    alpha = 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(s / (2 * a)))
    beta = 2 * np.arcsin(np.sqrt((s - c) / (2 * a)))
    return (np.sqrt(a **3 / mu) * (alpha - beta - (np.sin(alpha)
                                                      - np.sin(beta))))

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
This is in essence what @unutbu said. If so, you should accept his answer. –  esmit Jun 25 '13 at 16:42
    
@esmit when I used his solution though, it raised the the lower portion of the plot though something else was also different. –  dustin Jun 25 '13 at 16:49
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