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I'm new to Julia and I've written a simple function that calculates RMSE (root mean square error). ratings is a matrix of ratings, each row is [user, film, rating]. There are 15 million ratings. The rmse() method takes 12.0 s, but Java implementation is about 188x faster: 0.064 s. Why is the Julia implementation that slow? In Java, I'm working with an array of Rating objects, if it was a multidimensional int array, it would be even faster.

ratings = readdlm("ratings.dat", Int32)

function predict(user, film)
    return 3.462
end

function rmse()
    total = 0.0
    for i in 1:size(ratings, 1)
        r = ratings[i,:]
        diff = predict(r[1], r[2]) - r[3]
        total += diff * diff
    end
    return sqrt(total / size(ratings)[1])
end

EDIT: After avoiding the global variable, it finishes in 1.99 s (31x slower than Java). After removing the r = ratings[i,:], it's 0.856 s (13x slower).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A few suggestions:

  • Don't use globals. For annoying technical reasons, they're slow. Instead, pass ratings in as an argument.
  • The r = ratings[i,:] line makes a copy, which is slow. Instead, use predict(r[i,1], r[i,2]) - r[i,3].
  • square() may be faster than x*x -- try it.
  • If you're using the bleeding-edge Julia from source, check out the brand new NumericExtensions.jl package, which has insanely optimized functions for many common numerical operations. (see the julia-dev list)
  • Julia has to compile the code the first time it executes it. The right way to benchmark in Julia is to do the timing several times and ignore the first time through.
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This won't affect performance, but using size(ratings,1) is better than size(ratings)[1] which creates an array object, only to then pull a single value out of it. –  StefanKarpinski Jun 22 '13 at 15:23
    
The fact that you're accessing a global completely sabotages code generation, which has to emit code to check the type of ratings and its size on every single access and dynamically chose appropriate methods for array operations, so that's definitely a huge issue here. The pointless copy of a row from ratings on each loop is also definitely an issue here. The other things probably don't matter. –  StefanKarpinski Jun 22 '13 at 15:29
    
After avoiding the global and the row copying, it's much faster - 13x slower than Java (down from 188x slower). –  fhucho Jun 22 '13 at 16:11
    
It should definitely be faster than Java. See the new note about how to benchmark in Julia. You may also want to check out the Profile package. –  Harlan Jun 22 '13 at 18:41
    
@Harlan I get weird results with the code in tholy's answer (see my comment there). The first timing is always slower, but only negligably. –  fhucho Jun 23 '13 at 11:56

For me the following code runs in 0.024 seconds (and I doubt my laptop is a lot faster than your machine). I initialized ratings with the commented-out line, since I didn't have the file you referred to.

function predict(user, film)
    return 3.462
end

function rmse(r)
    total = 0.0
    for i = 1:size(r,1)
        diff = predict(r[i,1],r[i,2]) - r[i,3]
        total += diff * diff
    end
    return sqrt(total / size(r,1))
end

# ratings = rand(1:20, 5000000, 3)
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It's quite weird, you're code runs in 0.05 s but if I change the number of ratings from 5_000_000 to 15_000_000, it's sometimes ~0.13s and sometimes ~0.86 s. (Every time I measure 5 times.) –  fhucho Jun 23 '13 at 11:38
    
Update: I get similarly inconsistent result even with 5_000_000 ratings. Sometimes 0.05, sometimes 0.26. –  fhucho Jun 23 '13 at 11:49
    
The inconsistent results sound like there's some sort of garbage collection going on, which is a little weird, given that your code doesn't allocate anything I don't think. –  Harlan Jun 24 '13 at 13:27
    
You may want to try again with a fresh build of Julia; a couple of days ago I was seeing weird garbage collection issues, but things seem back to normal again now. –  tholy Jun 25 '13 at 16:42

On my system the problem seems to be that your constant-valued predict function doesn't get optimized out. Replacing the superfluous calls to predict makes the code run in 0.01 seconds.

function time()
    ratings = ones(15_000_000, 3)
    predict(user, film) = 3.462
    function rmse(ratings)
        total = 0.0
        for i in 1:size(ratings, 1)
            diff = predict(ratings[i, 1], ratings[i, 2]) - ratings[3]
            total += diff * diff
        end
        return sqrt(total / size(ratings, 1))
    end
    rmse(ratings)
    @elapsed rmse(ratings)
end

time()

function time2()
    ratings = ones(15_000_000, 3)
    predict(user, film) = 3.462
    function rmse(ratings)
        total = 0.0
        for i in 1:size(ratings, 1)
            diff = 3.462 - ratings[3]
            total += diff * diff
        end
        return sqrt(total / size(ratings, 1))
    end
    rmse(ratings)
    @elapsed rmse(ratings)
end

time2()
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If you pull the predict function out, so that it is not an inner function, then most (but not all) of the performance difference goes away. Apparently inner functions are not inlined? –  Steven G. Johnson Feb 24 '14 at 17:31

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