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Please see the below results and let me know where I can optimise my code further to get a better speedup.

Result

Machine used: Mac Book Pro Processor: 2.5 GHz Intel Core i5(at least 4 logical cores)
Memory: 4GB 1600 MHz Compiler: Mac OSX Compiler

Sequential Time:0.016466
Using two threads:0.0120111
Using four threads:0.0109911(Speed Up ~ 1.5)
Using 8 threads: 0.0111289

II Machine: OS: Linux Hardware: Intel(R) Core™ i5-3550 CPU @ 3.30GHz × 4 Memory: 7.7 GiB Compiler: G++ Version 4.6

Sequential Time:0.0128901
Using two threads:0.00838804
Using four threads:0.00612688(Speed up = 2)
Using 8 threads: 0.0101049

Please let me know what's the overhead in my code that is not giving a linear speedup. There is nothing much in the code. I am calling the function "findParallelUCHWOUP" in the main function like this:

#pragma omp parallel for private(th_id)
for (th_id = 0; th_id < nthreads; th_id++)
    findParallelUCHWOUP(points, th_id + 1, nthreads, inp_size, first[th_id], last[th_id]);

Code:

class Point {
    double i, j;
public:
    Point() {
        i = 0;
        j = 0;
    }
    Point(double x, double y) {
        i = x;
        j = y;
    }
    double x() const {
        return i;
    }
    double y() const {
        return j;
    }
    void setValue(double x, double y) {
        i = x;
        j = y;
    }

};
typedef std::vector<Point> Vector;

int second(std::stack<int> &s);
double crossProduct(Point v[], int a, int b, int c);
bool myfunction(Point a, Point b) {
    return ((a.x() < b.x()) || (a.x() == b.x() && a.y() < b.y()));
}

class CTPoint {
    int i, j;
public:
    CTPoint() {
        i = 0;
        j = 0;
    }
    CTPoint(int x, int y) {
        i = x;
        j = y;
    }
    double getI() const {
        return i;
    }
    double getJ() const {
        return j;
    }
};

const int nthreads = 4;
const int inp_size = 1000000;
Point output[inp_size];
int numElems = inp_size / nthreads;
int sizes[nthreads];
CTPoint ct[nthreads][nthreads];


//function that is called from different threads

    int findParallelUCHWOUP(Point* iv, int id, int thread_num, int inp_size, int first, int last) {


        output[first] = iv[first];
        std::stack<int> s;
        s.push(first);
        int i = first + 1;
        while (i < last) {
            if (crossProduct(iv, i, first, last) > 0) {
                s.push(i);
                i++;
                break;
            } else {
                i++;
            }
        }

        if (i == last) {
            s.push(last);
            return 0;
        }

        for (; i <= last; i++) {
            if (crossProduct(iv, i, first, last) >= 0) {
                while (s.size() > 1 && crossProduct(iv, s.top(), second(s), i) <= 0) {
                    s.pop();
                }
                s.push(i);
            }

        }

        int count = s.size();
        sizes[id - 1] = count;
        while (!s.empty()) {
            output[first + count - 1] = iv[s.top()];
            s.pop();
            count--;
        }

        return 0;
    }

    double crossProduct(Point* v, int a, int b, int c) {

        return (v[c].x() - v[b].x()) * (v[a].y() - v[b].y())
                - (v[a].x() - v[b].x()) * (v[c].y() - v[b].y());

    }

    int second(std::stack<int> &s) {

        int temp = s.top();
        s.pop();
        int sec = s.top();
        s.push(temp);
        return sec;
    }

    //reads points from a file and divides the array of points to different threads

    int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

    // read points from a file and assign them to the input array.
        Point *points = new Point[inp_size];
        unsigned i = 0;
        while (i < Points.size()) {
            points[i] = Points[i];
            i++;
        }



        numElems = inp_size / nthreads;
        int first[nthreads];
        int last[nthreads];
        for(int i=1;i<=nthreads;i++){
            first[i-1] = (i - 1) * numElems;
                if (i == nthreads) {
                    last[i-1] = inp_size - 1;
                } else {
                    last[i-1] = i * numElems - 1;
                }
        }

    /* Parallel Code starts here*/

        int th_id;

        omp_set_num_threads(nthreads);
        double start = omp_get_wtime();
    #pragma omp parallel for private(th_id)
        for (th_id = 0; th_id < nthreads; th_id++)
            findParallelUCHWOUP(points, th_id + 1, nthreads, inp_size, first[th_id], last[th_id]);

    /* Parallel Code ends here*/

        double end = omp_get_wtime();
        double diff = end - start;
        std::cout << "Time Elapsed in seconds:" << diff << '\n';

        return 0;
    }
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closed as too localized by larsmans, talonmies, Neil, bdash, john.k.doe Jun 22 '13 at 20:26

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1  
Are those times in seconds? If so, try a much bigger test. You might just be seeing OpenMP setup overhead, or even program loading. Also, why 8 threads on 4 cores for a CPU-bound problem? –  larsmans Jun 22 '13 at 15:20
    
I think even though physically Mac has two cores, I think it can support 4 threads(logical cores). –  user2491531 Jun 22 '13 at 15:26
    
gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/libgomp/omp_005fget_005fwtime.html measures the wall clock time in seconds and this is what I used. –  user2491531 Jun 22 '13 at 15:28

1 Answer 1

Threading in general and in your particular case, OpenMP do introduce a certain amount of overhead that does essentially prevent you from getting "real" linear speedup. You have to account for that.

Second, the runtime of your test is extremely short (I assume the times measure are seconds?). At that level you're also running into issues with the precision of timing the functions as a very small amount in overhead has a large impact on the measure result.

Last, you're also dealing with memory access here and if both the chunks you are processing and the stack you're creating don't fit into the processor cache, you also have to account for the overhead of fetching data from memory. The latter gets worse if you have multiple threads reading and possibly writing to the same area of memory. That will result in invalidated cache lines, which means that your cores will be waiting for data to be fetched into the cache and/or written to main memory.

I would massively increase the size of your data so you can runtimes in the seconds, for starters, then measure again. The longer running your test code is the better because the startup and general overhead of the threading will play less of a role if you do more processing.

Once you established a better baseline, you'll probably need a good profiler that gives you deeper insight into threading to see where the hotspots are in your code. It's not unusual that you might have to roll custom data structures for your parallelized part to improve the performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Timo for a detailed response. But how can I avoid cache problem? I suspected the same but no idea on how to solve that. –  user2491531 Jun 22 '13 at 15:35
    
And can I actually measure this using any tool? –  user2491531 Jun 22 '13 at 15:37
    
I think Intel has a bunch of tools that might be able to give you more insight. –  Timo Geusch Jun 22 '13 at 15:40
    
Vtune Amplifier will tell you about cache-misses, Parallel Advisor will tell you about parallel scalability (disclaimer, I work for Intel). –  Jim Cownie Jun 24 '13 at 11:23
    
Vtune is proprietary or is there a student version. I tried with perf on Linux but could not see much difference in the Cache misses between the sequential and Parallel implementations. I am not sure if I am using the perf tool correctly. –  user2491531 Jun 24 '13 at 20:06

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