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I'm trying to create a new RPG for iPhone, but I have a little problem when I come to think of a way to build my skill system. Basically, each class of character will have a determined set of skills, as in a classic RPG. However, I don't really know how to code them.

Some skills will do damages, some will heal, some will apply status changes, etc. So I had the idea to create a Basic Skill class with a function "activate()" to override, and then for each type of skills, create a subclass of that class. Like this :

@implementation BasicSkill
- (id) initFromName:(NSString*)_name
{
   int value = ...;
   int chanceOfEffect = ...;
   NSString *statusToChange = ...;
}

-(void) activate
{
//Do nothing
}
@end

@implementation DamageSkill : BasicSkill

-(void) activate
{
    int damageToDeal = value;
    //etc
}
@end

@implementation HealSkill : BasicSkill

-(void) activate
{
    int damageToHeal = value;
    //etc
}
@end

Every variables needed for each skill will be stored in a database (I already have the working functions for that), but I'm scared that it might create too much subclass for every type of skill, as I don't know how many types there will be...

The other idea I had was to create only one class, but each skill would have it's own function, stored in a SEL, and activate() would call it. (Sorry I don't really know how to explain it)

@implementation BasicSkill
- (id) initFromName:(NSString*)_name
{
   SEL action = NSSelectorFromString(@"Fireball");
   int value = ...;
   int chanceOfEffect = ...;
   NSString *statusToChange = ...;
}

-(void) activate
{
    [self performSelector:action];
}

-(void) fireball
{
    int damageToDeal = value;
    //etc...
}
@end

I don't know if those two patterns are both good practices, or if there's another way to do it, but if you know another solution, I'd be very happy to read it!

P.S Each player stats(HP, Atk, Def...) are stored in a Dictionary, so I have no problem to manipulate them however I want from Strings.

share|improve this question
3  
A skill (or spell) have a user and a target. The user is the user of the skill, and the target is the target of it, and the target may be the same as the user (for e.g. healing yourself) or be NULL (for e.g. area spells). You can pass these as arguments to your activate method, and in the inherited skills just do whatever is needed for that skill. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 22 '13 at 16:34
    
So should I use my first solution combined with yours? Because otherwise, how will I know which one will be the target before I pass it as argument if I only have one class? –  UnluckyPotato Jun 22 '13 at 16:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am no expert in RPG games (apart from playing some of them). However, I think you over-thinking it a little bit. For heal and damage skills, you do not even have to care whether the effect of the skill is a damage-to-heal or damage-to-deal. Damage affects on the hit points. So you can just say Skill X does +100 HP, Skill Y does -100 HP.

And you can do sth like this for all kinds of attributes (e.g. speed, dex, magic point).

And the effects of the skill could be dealt on both skill activator and skill target, which could be the same class but different instance (programming class, not the character class).

So, to answer your question, you could do it classical way, you subclass all skills from basic-skill class. You can subclass the skills into as many levels you want if they do similar stuff. (Like Heal Level 1, Heal Level 2 are subclasses of Heal class.)

Or if you have so many skills, you could spread the skills into a table of abilities. For example, I would create table like this:

Skill_ID, Skill_Name, HP_Target, MP_Target, Speed_Target, HP_Self, MP_Self, Speed_Self
       1,      Punch,   -50    ,    0     ,    -10      ,  0     ,   0    ,    0
       2,       Kick,  -100    ,    0     ,    -10      ,  0     ,   0    ,   -10  
       3,       Magic, -120    ,    0     ,      0      ,  0     ,  -25   ,    0
       4,       Heal,  +500    ,    0     ,      0      ,  0     ,  -25   ,   -10  

Then, you can just read the values of parameters that are affected by the skill from such table and apply them of target and self. This way, you may have only a few number of skill classes. If you have other modifiers or side-effects from the skill (like charging time), you can put them on the table too.

Again, I am no expert in the area but I hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! Modified a little bit your idea, but I'm totally going with that! Thank you really much! :D –  UnluckyPotato Jun 22 '13 at 20:17

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