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file1.pl

package ba;
#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

our $base_addr = 0x48;

file2.pl

package oa;
#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

our $offset_addr = 0;

file3.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl

do "file1.pl"
do "file2.pl"

my $final_val;

$final_val = $ba::base_addr + $oa::offset_addr;

printf "base_addr   = 0x%0x\n", $ba::base_addr;
printf "offset_addr = 0x%0x\n",  $oa::offset_addr;
printf "final addr  = 0x%0x\n", $final_val;

ERRORS### ->

  1. Argument "0x48" isn't numeric.
  2. Use of uninitialized value.
  3. Use of uninitialized value in addition.
share|improve this question
    
try require instead of do perlmonks.org/?node_id=760875 – Сухой27 Jun 22 '13 at 17:07
    
@mpapec: I did try using "require". It is not printing anything from file3.pl and also says file2.pl did not return a true value at file3.pl – Vinod R M Jun 22 '13 at 17:16
    
Why are you trying to do this instead of using a configuration file? – brian d foy Jun 23 '13 at 8:15

Two major errors, both of which are found by using use strict; use warnings;. Always do so. (You used it in your modules, but not in your script.)

  1. You correctly use $ba::base_addr in one spot, but then you proceeded to use non-existent variable $base_addr shortly afterwards.

    You can only access $ba::base_addr as $base_addr if the current package is ba, or if you create an alias to it named $base_addr.

    You either need to use $ba::base_addr consistently, or you need to export the variable to the using module. (This is one way to the alias I mentioned.)

  2. You never assign a value to $ba::base_addr and $oa::offset_addr, so Perl gives you warnings when you attempt to add them ("not numeric") and when you try to print them ("uninitialized").


Some other problems we'll fix at the same time:

  1. A module must return a true value, which is to say the last expression evaluated must evaluate to something true. It's thus standard to end a module with 1; (This applies to do too for reliable error detection: do $qfn or die $@ || $!;.)

  2. You should be using require instead of do since the files have a package declaration. It would be even better if you renamed them to .pm and used use.

  3. The name of a module should match it's package declaration. If it contains package ba;, the file should be named ba.pm.

  4. #! is only meaningful if 1) they are the first two characters of the file, and 2) if the the file is provided to the OS for execution. Neither of those are the case for your modules.


ba.pm:

package ba;

use strict;
use warnings;

our $base_addr = 123;

1;

oa.pm:

package oa;

use strict;
use warnings;

our $offset_addr = 456;

1;

script.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use ba qw( );
use oa qw( );

my $final_val = $ba::base_addr + $oa::offset_addr;

print "base_addr   = $ba::base_addr\n";
print "offset_addr = $oa::offset_addr\n";
print "final addr  = $final_val\n";

You could avoid saying the package name everywhere if you exported the variables, and mentioned earlier.

ba.pm:

package ba;

use strict;
use warnings;

use Exporter qw( import );
our @EXPORT_OK = qw( $base_addr );

our $base_addr = 123;

1;

oa.pm:

package oa;

use strict;
use warnings;

use Exporter qw( import );
our @EXPORT_OK = qw( $offset_addr );

our $offset_addr = 456;

1;

script.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use ba qw( $base_addr );
use oa qw( $offset_addr );

my $final_val = $base_addr + $offset_addr;

print "base_addr   = $base_addr\n";
print "offset_addr = $offset_addr\n";
print "final addr  = $final_val\n";

It's typically bad form to export variables, though. It's usually far better to create accessors.

ba.pm:

package ba;

use strict;
use warnings;

use Exporter qw( import );
our @EXPORT_OK = qw( base_addr );

my $base_addr = 123;

sub base_addr { $base_addr }

1;

oa.pm:

package oa;

use strict;
use warnings;

use Exporter qw( import );
our @EXPORT_OK = qw( offset_addr );

my $offset_addr = 456;

sub base_addr { $base_addr }

1;

script.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use ba qw( base_addr );
use oa qw( offset_addr );

my $final_val = base_addr() + offset_addr();

print "base_addr   = ".base_addr()."\n";
print "offset_addr = ".offset_addr()."\n";
print "final addr  = $final_val\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Also he has a syntax error: our offset_addr; - not using $ before the variable name and not returning true at the end of the module. – user4035 Jun 22 '13 at 17:27
    
@user4035, I know. Theses problems are fixed by the code I posted. – ikegami Jun 22 '13 at 17:34
    
@ikegami: I implemented things as you have told. But still getting the above errors. – Vinod R M Jun 22 '13 at 17:39
    
Which of the three sets of snippets did you run? – ikegami Jun 22 '13 at 17:40
    
@ikegami: file3.pl .... My base_addr and offset_addr are defined as 0x48 and 4 respectively.. Is that causing a problem? – Vinod R M Jun 22 '13 at 17:44

You need to rename your files, add return values and include them using use. Here:

file1.pm

package ba;

use strict;
use warnings;

our $base_addr = 17;

1;

file2.pm

package oa;

use strict;
use warnings;

our $offset_addr = 19;

1;

file3.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl

use file1;
use file2;

my $final_val;

$final_val = $ba::base_addr + $oa::offset_addr;

print "base_addr = $ba::base_addr\n";
print "offset_addr = $oa::offset_addr\n";
print "final addr = $final_val\n";
share|improve this answer
    
(package and file name should match, so you only half-fixed the file names) – ikegami Jun 22 '13 at 17:24
    
It's a good practice, yes, but they don't have to be the same. It's up to OP to decide; I'm merely answering his question. – Vedran Šego Jun 22 '13 at 17:31
    
Then use use file1 (); cause you're currently executing file1::import(). (In short, yeah, they really do need to be the same.) – ikegami Jun 22 '13 at 17:37

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