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I have tried literally everything to try to initialize the constructor so that when I create an object and pass the parameters in, it wont give me a crazy negative number, but it's still not working!

To test that it works I used the getHp and attack function. So for example, if I say Hero Hi(100, 200, 300, 400), then I say Hi.getHP(), it should be 100(the first parameter)...

//main.cpp
    int main()
    {
        Hero Me(100,20,30,40);//Created using overloaded constructor
        Monsters m(100,16,18,20);//creates a monster object and uses overloaded constructor
     to initialize
        cout << "\ntest1\n";
        Me.getHp();//expecting 100
        Me.getAttack();//expecting w.e is in parameters

        m.getHp();//expecting 100
        m.getAttack();//same as hero


        cin.sync();
        cin.get();
        return 0;
    }

Here is the rest of my code, in case you need it. I also left out headers and such for simpler code.

    //Characters.h
    class Characters
    {
    private:
        int level;
        int hp;
        int attack;
        int defense;
    protected:
        Characters(); // zero everything by default
        Characters(int, int, int, int); // populate explicitly
        ~Characters();
    public:
        int getAttack() const { return attack; }
        int getDefense() const { return defense; }
        int getHp() const { return hp; }
        int getlevel() const { return level; }

        void setAttack(int);
        void setDefense(int);
        void setStrength(int);
        void setHp(int);
        void setlevel(int);
        void damageTaken(int);
    };

    //Characters.cpp
    Characters::Characters() : level(0), hp(0), attack(0), defense(0) {}
    //
    //Characters::Characters(int seed)
    //{
    //    // NB. your code still doesn't initialize hp, strength etc.
    //    // it also logs level before initializing it, so that will be garbage
    //}

    //Characters::Characters(int hit, int lvl, int att, int def)
    // : level(lvl), hp(hit), attack(att), defense(def){}

    Hero::Hero(int newHp, int newLevel, int newAttack, int newDef)
        : Characters(newHp, newLevel, newAttack, newDef)
    {
        cout << "Hero created using Overloaded function!\n";
        HeroHp = newHp;
        cout << "Hp is: "<< HeroHp << endl;
        Herolevel = newLevel;
        cout << "level is: " << Herolevel << endl;
        HeroAttack = newAttack;
        cout << "Attack is: " << HeroAttack << endl;
        HeroDefense = newDef;
        cout << "Defense is: " << HeroDefense << endl;
        // logging goes here
        // note that you don't need HeroLevel etc. at all any more, just use level
    }

    Monsters::Monsters(int newHp, int newLevel, int newAttack, int newDef)
        : MonsterHp(newHp), Monsterlevel(newLevel), MonsterAttack(newAttack)
    , MonsterDefense(newDef)//initialize list
    {
        cout << "Monster created using Overloaded function!\n";
        MonsterHp = newHp;
        cout << "Hp is: "<< MonsterHp << endl;
        Monsterlevel = newLevel;
        cout << "level is: " << Monsterlevel << endl;
        MonsterAttack = newAttack;
        cout << "Attack is: " << MonsterAttack << endl;
        MonsterDefense = newDef;
        cout << "Defense is: " << MonsterDefense << endl;
    }


    Characters::~Characters()
    {
        cout << "Character has been destroyed!\n";
    }

    void Characters::setAttack(int att)
        {
            attack = att;
        }

    void Characters::setDefense(int def)
        {
            defense = def;
        }

    void Characters::setHp(int health)
        {
            hp = health;
        }

    void Characters::damageTaken(int damage)
        {
            hp -= damage;
        }

    void Characters::setlevel(int lvl)
        {
            level = lvl;
        }

    //Monsters.h
    class Monsters:
        public Characters //Hero
    {
    private:
        int Monsterlevel;
        int MonsterHp;
        int MonsterStrength;
        int MonsterAttack;
        int MonsterDefense;
    public:
        Monsters(int, int, int, int); //explicit
        ~Monsters();
    };

    //Monsters.cpp
    Monsters::~Monsters()
    {
        cout << "\nMonster Destroyed";
    }

    //Hero.h
    class Hero:
        public Characters
    {
    private:
        int Herolevel;
        int HeroHp;
        int HeroStrength;
        int HeroAttack;
        int HeroDefense;

    public:
        //Hero();
        Hero(int, int, int, int);
        ~Hero();

    };

    //Hero.cpp
    Hero::~Hero()
    {
        cout << "Hero destroyed!\n";
    }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

HeroHp in the Hero class and hp in the Characters class are separate variables. The constructor for Hero never intializes hp, which is the variable that is returned by getHp.

You probably want to eliminate the HeroXXX variables in the Hero class and use the corresponding ones in the Characters base class.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried, but it says that the variables of the character class cannot be accessed! –  BigD Jun 23 '13 at 15:47
    
Because they are private. Make them protected and then derived classes can access them. –  Steve Fallows Jun 23 '13 at 16:23

It works fine if I uncomment Characters constructor: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/view?id=261944b9b1304c3ed9d76e69b2318ee2-ad7854d9cfd7979d567ca413f0830b65

Are you sure you were compiling with success? You left some warnings around that might have deceived you... A very good reason for removing always all of your warnings.

share|improve this answer
    
but why though? Since both Hero and Monster is a "Character", don't i need the character constructor? –  BigD Jun 23 '13 at 15:46
    
@BigD I un-commented the Character constructor, which was commented in your code. –  Antonio Jun 23 '13 at 15:49
    
Yes, but im still not getting the expected result :( –  BigD Jun 23 '13 at 17:28
    
@BigD As somebody else already pointed out, there are several problems in your code. Variables in the base class should be protected, not private, otherwise they are not visible to the children classes. I don't think you want all those variables MosterHp or HeroHp. Remove all of them, because you don't need them, clean your code, avoid all warnings, and you'll see, if there is any problem left, it will be easier to spot. And I think you want "Monster" constructor implementation similar to that of "Hero", where the base class constructor is correctly called. –  Antonio Jun 23 '13 at 17:36

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