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I do not understand where the value for "line_count" is passed to this variable. If you can explain it to me I would really appreciate it!! The output prints each successive line. I understand how it increments the line numbers (1, 2, 3, 4), but how it is actually knowing where to get the data to print each string is confusing to me.

from sys import argv

script, input_file = argv

def print_all(f):
    print f.read()

def rewind(f):
    f.seek(0)

def print_a_line(line_count, f):
    print line_count, f.readline()

current_file = open(input_file)

print "First let's print the whole file:\n"

print_all(current_file)

print "Now let's rewind, kind of like a tape."

rewind(current_file)

print "Let's print three lines:"

current_line = 1
print_a_line(current_line, current_file)

current_line = current_line + 1
print_a_line(current_line, current_file)

current_line = current_line + 1
print_a_line(current_line, current_file)
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

After rewinding, the file pointer is back at the start of the file. Each call to f.readline() will read one line from f. After this the f's file pointer will be at the start of the next line. Therefore, the program reads the lines consecutively.

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ah ha! this answers my question quite well. thank you very much. – user2512132 Jun 23 '13 at 5:29
    
@user2512132: I gave an answer to what I thought was your question. However, you did not ask directly. It was hard to guess what your real problem is. As you can see my answer differs vastly from the others (because of this). – Nobody Jun 23 '13 at 14:13

line_count is a parameter of the function; it gets its value by a caller passing an argument when calling the function. In this case, the argument is the value of the current_line global variable.

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If you look at this bit of code:

current_line = 1
print_a_line(current_line, current_file)

You can see that current_line is passed to the print_a_line function, the variable is defined just above the function call. In the function print_a_line, line_count refers to the value of current_line.

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You have this function defined:

def print_a_line(line_count, f):
    print line_count, f.readline()

It is called in these lines:

current_line = current_line + 1
print_a_line(current_line, current_file)

Value of global variable current_line is passed as first argument to function print_a_line, where it is bound to local variable current_line.

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I hope you know the concept of how functions work?

If you do not, read that section over again in the Learn The Hard Way.

However, you would know that, when creating a function such as this:

def print_a_line(line_count, f):
    print line_count, f.readline()

You can see that there are two arguments or what are also called parameters, being passed to the function separated by commas. In the function, they are printed.

So when the function is used here:

current_line = 1 #current_line is 1
    print_a_line(current_line, current_file)

    # the variable current_line is passed into the function, in that first parameter 
    # as a result, 1 is printed

current_line = current_line + 1 # here the variable is assigned its own value + 1
    print_a_line(current_line, current_file)

    # now it will print 2 and that new value in the variable is passed into the function

current_line = current_line + 1
    print_a_line(current_line, current_file)

You need to understand that the function, even though is at the top of the document, you call it, or use it later on and pass on values that are used to do what the function does which is print.

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(the answer is just to print out which line you are (supposedly on) but its really just hard coded so its a bit sloppy in my opinion)

I had some issues with this, so looking at this function, it seems that i was under the impression that line_count was the line that you wanted to read, but in fact, all this function actually does is print the line that you hardcoded, and then call f.readline() and it reads each line one at a time as it is called....

i had thought if I had called print_a_line(line_count, f)

for example print_a_line(6, current_file) would give me line 6 of current_file but in reality it goes by how many times you had called f.readline() seems like each time you call this there is a counter within that function that counts how many times it has been called...

so if you called f.readline() 2 times, then it should be on line 3 next..

if you use f.seek(0) and rewind it afterwards, when you call f.readline() it goes back to line 1. and depends on how many f.readline() will read which line...

hope that helps someone else cause I was trying to add to this file, by asking the user which line you want to write and then call this function to print out that line... which didnt do it, so i guess a way I can do it would be to do a for loop to call f.read() whatever I got from the user input, and print out that line.... but you would need to check the number of lines in the file, and make sure the user inputs something less that the total number of lines...

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