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Say I have a trait Foo that I instantiate with an initial value i

val foo = new Foo(6) // class Foo(i: Int)

and I later call a secondMethod that in turn calls myMacro

foo.secondMethod(7) // def secondMethod(j: Int) = macro myMacro 

then, how can myMacro find the initial value of i (6)?

I didn't succeed with normal compilation reflection using c.prefix, c.eval(...) etc but instead found a 2-project solution:

Project B:

object CompilationB {
    def resultB(x: Int, y: Int) = macro resultB_impl
    def resultB_impl(c: Context)(x: c.Expr[Int], y: c.Expr[Int]) =
      c.universe.reify(x.splice * y.splice)
}

Project A (depends on project B):

trait Foo {
  val i: Int

  // Pass through `i` to compilation B:
  def apply(y: Int) = CompilationB.resultB(i, y)
}

object CompilationA {
  def makeFoo(x: Int): Foo = macro makeFoo_impl
  def makeFoo_impl(c: Context)(x: c.Expr[Int]): c.Expr[Foo] =
    c.universe.reify(new Foo {val i = x.splice})
}

We can create a Foo and set the i value either with normal instantiation or with a macro like makeFoo. The second approach allows us to customize a Foo at compile time in the first compilation and then in the second compilation further customize its response to input (i in this case)! In some way we get "meta-meta" capabilities (or "pataphysic"-capabilities ;-)

Normally we would need to have foo in scope to introspect i (with for instance c.eval(...)). But by saving the i value inside the Foo object we can access it anytime and we could instantiate Foo anywhere:

object Test extends App {
  import CompilationA._

  // Normal instantiation
  val foo1 = new Foo {val i = 7}
  val r1   = foo1(6)

  // Macro instantiation
  val foo2 = makeFoo(7)
  val r2   = foo2(6)

  // "Curried" invocation
  val r3 = makeFoo(6)(7)

  println(s"Result 1 2 3: $r1 $r2 $r3")
  assert((r1, r2, r3) ==(42, 42, 42))
}

My question

Can I find i inside my example macros without this double compilation hackery?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It turned out to be easy to access members of Foo inside the macro without having to resort to double compilation. Here is how our example macro can access the value of i:

    val i = c.Expr[Int](Select(c.prefix.tree, TermName("i")))
    reify(i.splice * j.splice)

To be precise, i here is actually an Expr that we can splice and work with inside the reify as a number value.

So yes, it is possible inside a macro (process) to access members (i) of the object (Foo) where the macro is defined (Foo) within a single compilation (by "defined" I mean where I use the macro keyword):

object compilation {
  def makeFoo(x: Int): Foo = macro makeFoo_impl
  def makeFoo_impl(c: Context)(x: c.Expr[Int]): c.Expr[Foo] =
    c.universe.reify(new Foo {val i = x.splice})

  def process(c: Context)(j: c.Expr[Int]): c.Expr[Int] = {
    import c.universe._
    // Foo.i accessed inside macro
    val i = c.Expr[Int](Select(c.prefix.tree, TermName("i")))
    reify(i.splice * j.splice)
  }
}

trait Foo {
  val i: Int
  def apply(j: Int) = macro compilation.process
}

object Test extends App {
  import compilation._

  val foo1 = new Foo {val i = 6}
  Console println foo1(7) // 42

  val foo2 = makeFoo(6)
  Console println foo2(7) // 42

  Console println makeFoo(6)(7) // 42
}

I owe this solution to a question/answer by Francesco Bellomi/Eugene Burmako on the Scala-user list that I found here.

As a side note, we don't necessarily need to use c.eval(...) to get the actual value from an Expr of some untyped [correct to say it like that?] Tree. In most cases we should be fine getting the value wrapped in an Expr since we can use that as a value by splicing it inside a reify and do all our calculations with the (splice-)value there!

share|improve this answer
    
Another example with prefix stackoverflow.com/a/17028600/1296806 and see the end of this answer for self-answering: stackoverflow.com/a/12486993/1296806 –  som-snytt Jun 24 '13 at 23:00
    
Ok, thanks. Just marked my own answer as an answer :-) –  Marc Grue Jun 25 '13 at 4:25
    
I actually studied the other answer you refer too. But I didn't make the mental leap from the Tree deconstruction-construction in that example to using prefix as basis for Tree construction. Well I tried several combinations, but not the Select(c.prefix.tree, TermName("i")) one. –  Marc Grue Jun 25 '13 at 4:37

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