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Consider the following code:

void f(float x)
{
    x * (true ? 1.f : 0.0);
}

The type of declval(bool) ? declval(float) : declval(double) is double according to the C++ standard [expr.cond].

Does this mean that the above code has to be equivalent to:

void f(float x)
{
    double(x) * 1.0;
} 

Or is there a statement that allows an optimization in case the first operand of ?: is a compile time constant expression ?

share|improve this question
    
Is that from the obfuscated c++ contest? The true ? 1.0f : ... always evaluates to 1.0f, but does it make sense to multiply with 1.0f? – ott-- Jun 22 '13 at 20:54
1  
@ott-- That's a good way of wording the question in such a way that answers will focus only on what the question is really about. Pretty much any other constant would likely get answers focusing on rounding, even though that isn't the point of the question. – hvd Jun 22 '13 at 21:22
4  
An expression can always only have one type, so the type of something ? a : b will and must always be the same, no matter what something is. – Xeo Jun 22 '13 at 22:23
2  
It's not equivalent to your second code example, it's equivalent to x * 1.0, which has type double, there is no cast back to float – Jonathan Wakely Jun 22 '13 at 23:58
    
@Xeo An expression that has a dependent type can have different types in different template instantiations. (I know you know this, and that you didn't mean to suggest otherwise.) – hvd Jun 23 '13 at 1:46
up vote 10 down vote accepted

A C++ compiler can optimize as it sees fit, provided that it does not alter the "observable behaviour" of a conforming program (§1.9p1, the so-called "as if" rule).

For example, if on a given platform it is known that multiplying by 1.0 is an identity transformation without the potential to trap, then the multiplication does not actually need to be performed. (This may or may not be true for a given architecture, since it is possible that multiplying a NaN value by 1.0 could trap. However, the compiler could also replace the multiplication by any other operation which would produce the same trap under the same circumstances.)

In the absence of traps and assuming that multiplication by 1.0 is an identity transform, the entire body of your function f can be eliminated, because the standard requires that the set of float values is a subset of the set of double values (possibly the same set). Consequently, the float->double->float round trip must return to the original value or trap. (§3.9.1p8: "The set of values of the type float is a subset of the set of values of the type double". §4.8p1: "A prvalue of floating point type can be converted to a prvalue of another floating point type. If the source value can be exactly represented in the destination type, the result of the conversion is that exact representation.")

So, yes, optimizations may be possible. But that does not affect the type of the ?: expression, in the case that the type is observable (for example, if the expression were to be used for template deduction or as the operand of decltype).

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Yes, it does mean that the above codes are equivalent.

Using RTTI we can check that at least both clang and g++ are standard conformant and give d (e.g. double) as an output to this program:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

int main() {
    float x = 3.;
    auto val = x * (true ? 1.f : 0.0);
    std::cout << typeid(val).name() << std::endl;
}

And the alternative way using C++11 type traits

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

int main() {
    float x = 3.;
    auto val = x * (true ? 1.f : 0.0);
    std::cout << std::boolalpha <<
        std::is_same<decltype(val), double>::value << std::endl;
}

Outputs true.

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