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Hi was reading about that a string is thread safe because it is immutable.

For example i do:

String a = "test";

One thread uses this variable. But another thread could still also use this variable and change it:

a = a + "something";

So it would change or not?

If it would be volatile, i would get it, that it can just be used by one thread at a time. But immutabilty doesnt guarantee me this!?

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it would change cause a will takes a new value, the variable 'a' will reference to a different. not mutate.. –  nachokk Jun 22 '13 at 22:12
    
I know that it will change. But if it will change then it is not thread safe if two threads can change its value? –  krackmoe Jun 22 '13 at 22:12
3  
There's a big difference between a data structure being thread-safe and a bit of code being thread-safe. –  selig Jun 22 '13 at 22:14

5 Answers 5

You're not changing the object pointed by a, but where a points to:

String a = "test";

here a points to a string "test"

a = a + "something";

here a new string is created as the result of the concatenation of "test" and "something", which "testsomething" where a points to. It's a different instance.

So there is no problem of thread safety, as both threads will have their own a referring to the same "test" string object, but once one of those thread will modify the string to be referring the "testsomething" object, the other Thread will still be referring the original "test" object.

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Ah okay! Thats maybe the point i was missing. I thought that if i concat a string no new string is going to be created. If a new string is created then the question is solved. –  krackmoe Jun 22 '13 at 22:15
    
you can easily check that using eclipse's debugger, which shows hash and addresses of references. –  zmo Jun 22 '13 at 22:18
    
How can i check the reference in the debugger? –  krackmoe Jun 22 '13 at 22:28
    
as far as I can remember, it's in the Variables view. I don't have eclipse installed on my current computer, so I can't tell you where exactly. But it's in that view (cf that tutorial) –  zmo Jun 22 '13 at 22:32
1  
Okay doesnt matter, i just made a sys println of hashcode of each variable! –  krackmoe Jun 22 '13 at 22:37

The String itself isn't changing, the reference is. It sounds like you need the reference to be final. Immutability guarantees that the Object does not change, not that the reference cannot change. Just mark it like this:

final String a = "test";
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You can make the code thread safe trivially by having each thread copy the reference a. In fact, that’s normally what happens anyway, since you usually pass the string to the thread via a parameter.

So both threads hold a reference to the original string, here "test". If thread 1 now modifies a it only modifies this reference. Thread 2 still retains an intact reference to "test" because the string itself (rather than the reference) is immutable.

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Strings objects are thread-safe. If your String a is a local variable then this code is still thread-safe. If it is a field of your class than it is your responsibility to guarantee its thread-safety. Thread-safety of String won't magically make your own code thread-safe. You should take care about it.

You can make field volatile then you get visibility among threads. So any thread will see up-to-date value of your field. But you won't get atomicity in this way. Imagine the following. Let a = "test". Thread 1 updates a and thread 2 updates a. They both see current value which is "test". They read it, make new strings by concatenation and update value of a. And what will be that value? It is unknown. It can be "testsomethingsomething" if threads perform their operations strictly one after another. But it can be just "testsomething". For instance:

  • thread 1 read "test" from a
  • thread 2 read "test" from a
  • thread 2 updates a with "testsomething"
  • thread 1 updates a (remember, it read a as "test" before) with the same "testsomething"

Voila, you've lost an update to your field. To avoid this kind of problem, you should guard all accesses and modifications to your field with synchronization on single lock object.

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So for example i use it as a field of my class in a HttpServlet. I have to make it volatile to make it thread safe right? But as a local variable, it is all the time thread safe!? –  krackmoe Jun 22 '13 at 22:16
    
If it is local, everything is OK. Local variables are not reachable from other threads. If it is a field than it depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you make it volatile than all thread will see changes to it. If it is enough for your task then yes, your code will be thread safe. –  Rorick Jun 22 '13 at 22:19
1  
@krackmoe, with your current code you may have lost updates. To avoid this you need to make concatenation atomic. –  michael nesterenko Jun 22 '13 at 22:21

A lot of confusion here...

What thread safety of some class means is that concurrent use of it's instance will not destroy it's internal structure.

In our case it is just a warranty that we finally get a "testsomething", but not a mess like "tsomethingest" or "tesomethingst" or "tseosmtething" or "somethingtest".

Here a "quick and dirty" illustration:

public class Test2 {

private volatile String tstStr = "";

Test2(){
}

void impl(int par){
    Thread wrk = new Thread(new MyRun(par));
    wrk.start();
}

static public void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
   Test2 tst2 = new Test2();
   long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
   Thread wrk;
   for (int i = 0; i < 9; i=i+1) {
       tst2.impl(i);
   }
   long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
   System.out.println("The process took " + (endTime - startTime) + " milliseconds");
}

class MyRun implements Runnable {
    int no;
    MyRun(int var){
        no = var;
    }
    public void run(){
        tstStr = tstStr + " " + no;
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i=i+1) {
            System.out.println("Message from "+no+", tested string ="+tstStr);
        }
    }
}

}

Message from 1, tested string = 0
Message from 1, tested string = 0 2 3
Message from 1, tested string = 0 2 3
Message from 4, tested string = 0 2 3 4
Message from 4, tested string = 0 2 3 4
Message from 0, tested string = 0 2
Message from 8, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8
Message from 5, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5
Message from 0, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5
Message from 0, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5
The process took 0 milliseconds
Message from 7, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7
Message from 7, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
Message from 4, tested string = 0 2 3 4
Message from 3, tested string = 0 2 3
Message from 2, tested string = 0 2
Message from 3, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
Message from 7, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
Message from 6, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
Message from 5, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5
Message from 8, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5
Message from 5, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
Message from 6, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
Message from 3, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
Message from 2, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
Message from 6, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
Message from 8, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
Message from 2, tested string = 0 2 3 4 7 8 5 6
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