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Does memory visibility depend on which monitor is used? Lock B is acquired after lock A is released, is it enough for memory visibility?

for example following code:

int state; // shared


// thread A
synchronized (A) {
 state += 1;
}
Thread.sleep(10000000);

// thread B
Thread.sleep(1000);
synchronized(B) {
 state += 1;
}

threads are started in the same time and thread B sleep time may be arbitrarily high, just to ensure that it is executed after thread A used state variable. Thread A sleep time is used to ensure that thread does not finish before thread B uses state shared variable.

UPDATE

From http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/j-jtp03304/

When a thread exits a synchronized block as part of releasing the associated monitor, the JMM requires that the local processor cache be flushed to main memory.

Similarly, as part of acquiring the monitor when entering a synchronized block, local caches are invalidated so that subsequent reads will go directly to main memory and not the local cache.

If this is true then I see no reason for state variable not to be visible to thread B

Further, however they say that monitor should be the same, but it is not implied from aforementioned statements.

This process guarantees that when a variable is written by one thread during a synchronized block protected by a given monitor and read by another thread during a synchronized block protected by the same monitor, the write to the variable will be visible by the reading thread. 

It seems that process of local memory flush is not so straightforward as it is described in the first statement and may not happen on every lock release?

share|improve this question
    
The happens-before relation is binary i.e. is between two events only. It is transitive though. You only get memory visibility of A from B if A happens before B. – selig Jun 22 '13 at 23:08
    
@selig, but does Thread.sleep add happens before relationship? – michael nesterenko Jun 22 '13 at 23:11
    
No - as detailed here in the JLS neither Sleep nor Yield have synchronization semantics i.e. take part in the happens-before relationship. – selig Jun 23 '13 at 20:28
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, it depends. You can read this doc about this. Relevant section is "17.4.4. Synchronization Order":

An unlock action on monitor m synchronizes-with all subsequent lock actions on m (where "subsequent" is defined according to the synchronization order).

You see, a concrete monitor object m is specified there. If monitors are different, then you are not getting synchronizes-with relationship, hence, you do not get happens-before relationship (from the 17.4.5):

If an action x synchronizes-with a following action y, then we also have hb(x, y).

So, your updates will be performed out of order with possible missing updates.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I read that doc. But it seems for me that there is no hb relationship due to lack of mutual exclusion. However in my example mutual exclusion is guaranteed with waits. If my case is also described by doc, then how could happen that state is not visible to thread B if on lock release local memory is flushed to global memory? – michael nesterenko Jun 22 '13 at 23:18
    
You may have seemingly correct behaviour, but it depends on implementation I think. As far as I understand, JVM spec doesn't specify exactly how and when flushes are performed. So you cannot rely on this behaviour. – Rorick Jun 24 '13 at 9:12

Does memory visibility depend on which monitor is used? Yes.

Lock B is acquired after lock A is released, is it enough for memory visibility? No.

The two threads have to synchronize on the same monitor in order to see each others' writes. In your example, both threads could see state having the value 1. No matter what sleep intervals you insert. It of course depends on the implementation of the JVM you're using and different JVMs could yield different results. Basically, you have unsynchronized access to a field and that should always be avoided (because it's not deterministic what value state has).

Read more in the excellent chapter on the Memory Model in the Java Specification.

share|improve this answer
    
That is a bit strange. As I understand there are two memory kinds, thread local (registers, processor cache etc.) and global memory. On lock acquirement local memory is cleared and values are read from global memory, on lock release local memory is flushed to global memory. Could you explain why state may not be visible if it is flushed into global memory (A release) and then it is forced to be read (B acquirement) – michael nesterenko Jun 22 '13 at 23:12
    
Or that could happen that local memory is not flushed to global memory on lock release and is in lock local memory (visible to thread released lock and thread that will acquire lock)? – michael nesterenko Jun 22 '13 at 23:16
    
It's basically because the two threads do not establish a happens-before relationship. So the JVM will not "flush" the changes to main memory and could cache a local version. Why shouldn't it cache it? The speedup could be enormous and the programmer didn't indicate he wanted the two threads to communicate writes (i.e. because of the missing synchronization). – Nicholas Jun 22 '13 at 23:16
    
From ibm.com/developerworks/library/j-jtp03304 When a thread exits a synchronized block as part of releasing the associated monitor, the JMM requires that the local processor cache be flushed to main memory. It seems that lock release should always flush local memory. If so then I do not understand why state may not be visible to thread B – michael nesterenko Jun 22 '13 at 23:22
    
According to the Java Language Specification, only when another thread acquires a lock on the same monitor (as thread #1). I've read the IBM reference you linked to and it's consistent with the specification. I can only recommend you get a good cup of coffee and read chapter 17 in the specification. :-) – Nicholas Jun 22 '13 at 23:29

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