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I wonder, why can't I compile this one:

class MyClass{
  override def toString = "123:" + if (true) "456" else "789"
  //error:  illegal start of simple expression
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Try this:

override def toString = "123:" + (if (true) "456" else "789")
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It was useful to me when I realized that "simple expression" is in contrast to "expr": github.com/scala/scala-dist/blob/master/documentation/src/… It clarifies similar questions like why can't I (Console println throw new RuntimeException). –  som-snytt Jun 23 '13 at 4:42
    
Yeah, there a few precedence issues regarding these expressions. Check this out docs.scala-lang.org/sips/pending/uncluttering-control.html, maybe in the near future... –  pedrofurla Jun 23 '13 at 16:37

pedrofurla is right. With your expression the compiler tries to mix the string with the if and fails. Using parenthesis you eliminate ambiguity in your expressions.

class MyClass{
   override def toString = "123:" + (if (true) "456" else "789")
}

I found this simple online service where you can test your scala expressions: http://www.simplyscala.com/

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