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I know how to tell the browser to download cached fuiles again by simply changing a character in the appcache manifest, but when I do that, how can I make sure the browser downloads the new file without doing things like changing filenames?

I am aware of file expiration headers I can send, but I have no experience with them. Would they even work with HTML5 caching? Which ones do I send?

I'm under the impression that browsers aren't smart enough to detect when a file is modified, and will continue using the cached file until you force it by refreshing the page or changing the filename. I don't want to do that since it also means updating the manifest and is just extra work.

My optimal solution is to change the manifest slightly, then the browser goes and fetches any changed files without me forcing it to.

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Expiry headers work just fine with appcache, learn how to use them. – robertc Jun 23 '13 at 7:26
1  
@robertc I'll do some research on them even if your comment comes off as being a smart-ass. – Jared Jun 24 '13 at 7:02
up vote 3 down vote accepted

What I do is add the timestamp as a comment in the manifest

# 20130623 025200

And just update it each time I want to force a refresh.

EDIT: As I noted in the comments, The browser will re-download all files explicitly enumerated in the manifest. For files that are not in the manifest (for example, CSS or images referenced in an HTML file but not in the manifest), the default expiry take precedence.

The algorithm is described in the standard: http://www.w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/browsers.html#downloading-or-updating-an-application-cache

share|improve this answer
    
"I know how to tell the browser to download cached files again by simply changing a character in the appcache manifest". I already stated I know how to do that, but my issue is when it's changed, how do I know if the browser will re-download the files correctly? – Jared Jun 24 '13 at 7:00
1  
@Jared The browser will re-download all files explicitly enumerated in the manifest: w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/… For files that are not in the manifest, the default expiry etc take precedence – SheetJS Jun 24 '13 at 13:20
    
That's what I was hoping for. I would edit your answer to include that, and I'll mark it as the answer. – Jared Jun 25 '13 at 7:27
    
@Jared updated response – SheetJS Jun 25 '13 at 14:24

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