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Why does the boolean && work in this situation? When I type in "yellow" shouldn't it "short circuit" and not check the second condition since the first condition "red" is false?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>    
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string color;
    do
    {
        cout << "Pick one of the colors: red, yellow, or blue\n";
        cin >> color;
    }while ((color != "red") && ( color != "yellow") && ( color != "blue"));

    {
        cout << "I like that color too";
        return 0;
    }
}

  

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Why did you use the second pair of parenthesis at all ? It's part of the problem here? –  Emadpres Jun 23 '13 at 6:52
    
You just need a small ! before the whole condition to correct it. –  Emadpres Jun 23 '13 at 6:56
1  
'since the first condition "red" is false?' It actually isn't. That is probably the source of the whole confusion. –  ComicSansMS Jun 23 '13 at 7:03
    
This isn't the issue, but the code has too many parentheses. In this example, you don't need them around simple expressions like color != "red". –  Pete Becker Jun 23 '13 at 11:58
    
thanks for all your super fast responses! I figured out my misconception. –  banana frenzy Jun 24 '13 at 0:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When color is "yellow", then (color != "red") is true. So it checks the next condition, (color != "yellow"), which is false. So the condition is false. The third test (color != "blue") is not performed, since the expression evaluated to false already, and so its evaluation was short-circuited.

(color != "red")            // color == "yellow", so this is true
&& (color != "yellow")      // color == "yellow", so this is false
&& (color != "blue")
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thanks, I don't know why i was having trouble with that simple concept. –  banana frenzy Jun 23 '13 at 7:15
    
You're very welcome. –  jxh Jun 23 '13 at 7:22

In && case event if first single condition evaluate to false the result will the whole conditions will be evaluated to false.

Try this solution

while ((color != "red") || ( color != "yellow") ||( color != "blue"));
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It seems that the questioner wanted this code at the first place but it's not an answer to what he is asking ;) –  0xc0de Jun 23 '13 at 6:57

Here is another way to look at the code:

Seeing how the words while and until are opposite, we can rewrite do while(x) as a do until(!x); loop, iterating through the loop until the condition (!x) is true.

Substituting until(!x) for while(x), we get

#include <iostream>
#define until(!(x)) while(x)

int main()
{
    string color;
    do
    {
        cout << "Pick one of the colors: red, yellow, or blue\n";
        cin >> color;
     }
    until (!((color != "red") && ( color != "yellow") && ( color != "blue")));

    cout << "I like that color too";
    return 0;

}

Using DeMorgan's Theorem, which states that !((!x[0])&&(!x[1])&&...&&(!x[n])) == x[0] || x[1] || ... || x[n], we can transform the until statement into

until(color == "red" || color == "yellow" || color == "blue");    

Because ORs only short circuit when the condition is true, when you type in "yellow", the first condition goes false and the second condition goes true. This causes a short circuit which then breaks out of the do while() loop and prints "I like that color too"!

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The syntax should be `repeat{} until()'. –  rohit shrivastava Jun 23 '13 at 7:05
    
I am not using formal programming conventions. I am simply using ad-hoc substitutions to try to clarify the problem. –  jcccj1 Jun 23 '13 at 7:07
    
Well putting it in the code block (and inside a main() code) confuses... –  0xc0de Jun 23 '13 at 7:08
    
You are correct. I have added a #define to try to help clarify. –  jcccj1 Jun 23 '13 at 7:11

Actually the confusion lies in your understanding of the condition :

color != "red"

When you type yellow it is actually true as the color ain't red , it however short-circuits here :

color != "yellow" 

because the condition is false and since the operands to && must all be true it short-circuits.

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In fact it has to do, it will be printed only when the user gets out of the loop, ie. only when he/she chooses red or yellow or blue. –  0xc0de Jun 23 '13 at 7:06

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