Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the advantage of using uint8_t over unsigned char in C?

I know that on almost every system uint8_t is just a typedef for unsigned char, so why use it?

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 88 down vote accepted

It documents your intent - you will be storing small numbers, rather than a character.

Also it looks nicer if you're using other typedefs such as uint16_t or int32_t.

share|improve this answer
1  
The correct type is uintN_t, if we're talking about the C99 stdint.h types. –  Chris Lutz Nov 12 '09 at 22:33
    
It wasn't clear in the original question if we were talking about a standard type or not. I'm sure there have been many variations of this naming convention over the years. –  Mark Ransom Nov 12 '09 at 22:50
4  
Explicitly using unsigned char or signed char documents the intent too, since unadorned char is what shows you're working with characters. –  caf Nov 12 '09 at 23:37
6  
I thought an unadorned unsigned was unsigned int by definition? –  Mark Ransom Nov 29 '09 at 19:29
3  
@endolith, using uint8_t for a string isn't necessarily wrong, but it's definitely weird. –  Mark Ransom Nov 14 '11 at 13:58

Just to be pendantic, some systems may not have an 8 bit type. According to Wikipedia:

An implementation is required to define exact-width integer types for N = 8[2], 16, 32, or 64 if and only if it has any type that meets the requirements. It is not required to define them for any other N, even if it supports the appropriate types.

So uint8_t isn't guaranteed to exist, though it will for all platforms where 8 bits = 1 byte. Some embedded platforms may be different, but that's getting very rare. Some systems may define char types to be 16 bits, in which case there probably won't be an 8-bit type of any kind.

Other than that (minor) issue, @Mark Ransom's answer is the best in my opinion. Use the one that most clearly shows what you're using the data for.

Also, I'm assuming you meant uint8_t (the standard typedef from C99 provided in the stdint.h header) rather than uint_8 (not part of any standard).

share|improve this answer
    
DSPs with CHAR_BIT > 8 are becoming less rare, not more. –  caf Nov 12 '09 at 23:36
2  
@caf, out of sheer curiosity - can you link to description of some? I know they exist because someone mentioned one (and linked to developer docs for it) in a comp.lang.c++.moderated discussion on whether C/C++ type guarantees are too weak, but I cannot find that thread anymore, and it's always handy to reference that in any similar discussions :) –  Pavel Minaev Nov 12 '09 at 23:40
2  
"Some systems may define char types to be 16 bits, in which case there probably won't be an 8-bit type of any kind." - and despite some incorrect objections from me, Pavel has demonstrated in his answer that if char is 16 bits, then even if the compiler does provide an 8 bit type, it must not call it uint8_t (or typedef it to that). This is because the 8bit type would have unused bits in the storage representation, which uint8_t must not have. –  Steve Jessop Nov 13 '09 at 3:29
1  
The SHARC architecture has 32-bit words. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… for details. –  BruceCran Nov 13 '09 at 16:17
    
And TI's C5000 DSPs (which were in OMAP1 and OMAP2) are 16bit. I think for OMAP3 they went to C6000-series, with an 8bit char. –  Steve Jessop Nov 13 '09 at 17:30

The whole point is to write implementation-independent code. unsigned char is not guaranteed to be a 8-bit type. uint8_t is.

share|improve this answer
2  
...if it exists on a system, but that's going to be very rare. +1 –  Chris Lutz Nov 12 '09 at 22:57
    
well if you really had trouble with your code not compiling on a system because uint8_t didn't exist, you could use find and sed to automatically change all occurences of uint8_t to unsigned char or something more useful to you. –  bazz Jul 24 at 20:36

As you said, "almost every system".

char is probably one of the less likely to change, but once you start using uint16_t and friends, using uint8_t blends better, and may even be part of a coding standard.

share|improve this answer
44  
No need to put that under each response, Chris. –  asdf Jun 9 '11 at 18:38

There's little. From portability viewpoint, char cannot be smaller than 8 bits, and nothing can be smaller than char, so if a given C implementation has an unsigned 8-bit integer type, it's going to be char. Alternatively, it may not have one at all, at which point any typedef tricks are moot.

It could be used to better document your code in a sense that it's clear that you require 8-bit bytes there and nothing else. But in practice it's a reasonable expectation virtually anywhere already (there are DSP platforms on which it's not true, but chances of your code running there is slim, and you could just as well error out using a static assert at the top of your program on such a platform).

share|improve this answer
3  
@Skizz - No, the standard requires unsigned char to be able to hold values between 0 and 255. If you can do that in 4 bits, my hat is off to you. –  Chris Lutz Nov 12 '09 at 22:50
1  
"it'd be a bit more cumbersome" - cumbersome in the sense that you'd have to walk (swim, catch a plane, etc) all the way over to where the compiler writer was, slap them in the back of the head, and make them add uint8_t to the implementation. I wonder, do compilers for DSPs with 16bit chars typically implement uint8_t, or not? –  Steve Jessop Nov 12 '09 at 23:06
2  
By the way, on a second thought, it is perhaps the most straightforward way to say "I really need 8 bits" - #include <stdint.h>, and use uint8_t. If the platform has it, it will give it to you. If the platform doesn't have it, your program will not compile, and the reason will be clear and straightforward. –  Pavel Minaev Nov 12 '09 at 23:23
2  
Still no cigar, sorry: "For unsigned integer types other than unsigned char, the bits of the object representation shall be divided into two groups: value bits and padding bits ... If there are N value bits, each bit shall represent a different power of 2 between 1 and 2^(N-1), so that objects of that type shall be capable of representing values from 0 to 2^(N-1) using a pure binary representation ... The typedef name intN_t designates a signed integer type with width N, no padding bits, and a two’s complement representation." –  Pavel Minaev Nov 13 '09 at 2:38
1  
If you just need arithmetic modulo, unsigned bitfield will do just fine (if inconvenient). It's when you need, say, an array of octets with no padding, that's when you're SOL. Moral of the story is not to code for DSPs, and stick to proper, honest-to-God 8-bit char architectures :) –  Pavel Minaev Nov 13 '09 at 6:10

On almost every system I've met uint8_t == unsigned char, but this is not guaranteed by the C standard. If you are trying to write portable code and it matters exactly what size the memory is, use uint8_t. Otherwise use unsigned char.

share|improve this answer

That is really important for example when you are writing a network analyzer. packet headers are defined by the protocol specification, not by the way a particular platform's C compiler works.

share|improve this answer
    
back when I asked this I was definint a simple protocol for communticaion over serial. –  Oxinabox Jun 4 '11 at 11:47

In my experience there are two places where we want to use uint8_t to mean 8 bits (and uint16_t, etc) and where we can have fields smaller than 8 bits. Both places are where space matters and we often need to look at a raw dump of the data when debugging and need to be able to quickly determine what it represents.

The first is in RF protocols, especially in narrow-band systems. In this environment we may need to pack as much information as we can into a single message. The second is in flash storage where we may have very limited space (such as in embedded systems). In both cases we can use a packed data structure in which the compiler will take care of the packing and unpacking for us:

#pragma pack(1)
typedef struct {
  uint8_t    flag1:1;
  uint8_t    flag2:1;
  padding1   reserved:6;  /* not necessary but makes this struct more readable */
  uint32_t   sequence_no;
  uint8_t    data[8];
  uint32_t   crc32;
} s_mypacket __attribute__((packed));
#pragma pack()

Which method you use depends on your compiler. You may also need to support several different compilers with the same header files. This happens in embedded systems where devices and servers can be completely different - for example you may have an ARM device that communicates with an x86 Linux server.

There are a few caveats with using packed structures. The biggest gotcha is that you must avoid dereferencing the address of a member. On systems with mutibyte aligned words, this can result in a misaligned exception - and a coredump.

Some folks will also worry about performance and argue that using these packed structures will slow down your system. It is true that, behind the scenes, the compiler adds code to access the unaligned data members. You can see that by looking at the assembly code in your IDE.

But since packed structures are most useful for communication and data storage then the data can be extracted into a non-packed representation when working with it in memory. Normally we do not need to be working with the entire data packet in memory anyway.

Here is some relevant discussion:

pragma pack(1) nor __attribute__ ((aligned (1))) works

Is gcc's __attribute__((packed)) / #pragma pack unsafe?

http://solidsmoke.blogspot.ca/2010/07/woes-of-structure-packing-pragma-pack.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.