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What is the difference between g++ and gcc? Which ones should be used for general c++ development?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 239 down vote accepted

gcc is 'Gnu Compiler Collection'. If you pass it a C++ file, it will invoke the C++ compiler ('g++') behind the scenes.

gcc is essentially the frontend for several compilers and the linker too.

Edit: As several people pointed out, this doesn't mean that 'gcc' and 'g++' are interchangeable for c++ files: gcc will invoke g++ with different arguments to what you'd get if you'd invoked g++ directly.

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@Brian: I spend several years thinking that 'gpp' was the C++ backend... –  Mike F Oct 5 '08 at 21:00
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gcc used to mean 'Gnu C Compiler'. That eventually changed when more languages were added. –  Ferruccio Oct 5 '08 at 21:49
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That's not entirely true. If you just run gcc on a C++ file, it will not 'just work' like g++ does. That's because it won't automatically link to the C++ std library, etc. Just use g++ for C++ files. –  jonner Oct 5 '08 at 23:57
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The actual compiler is "cc1" for C and "cc1plus" for C++; both gcc and g++ are drivers (which call the preprocessor/compiler/assembler/linker as needed). –  CesarB Oct 23 '08 at 14:34
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+1 because I didn't know that the c stood for collection. –  René Nyffenegger Mar 30 '12 at 8:44

GCC: GNU Compiler Collection

  • Referrers to all the different languages that are supported by the GNU compiler.

gcc: GNU C      Compiler
g++: GNU C++ Compiler

The main differences:

  1. gcc will compile: *.c/*.cpp files as C and C++ respectively.
  2. g++ will compile: *.c/*.cpp files but they will all be treated as C++ files.
  3. Also if you use g++ to link the object files it automatically links in the std C++ libraries (gcc does not do this).
  4. gcc compiling C files has less predefined macros.
  5. gcc compiling *.cpp and g++ compiling *.c/*.cpp files has a few extra macros.

Extra Macros when compiling *.cpp files:

#define __GXX_WEAK__ 1
#define __cplusplus 1
#define __DEPRECATED 1
#define __GNUG__ 4
#define __EXCEPTIONS 1
#define __private_extern__ extern
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13  
You can link the std C++ library in gcc by passing -lstdc++ parameter. –  Denilson Sá Aug 23 '10 at 0:13
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There are more differences between 'gcc' and 'g++' than only the standard libraries, so gcc -lstdc++ will still not get you the same behavior as g++. We put all of that language-specific behavior into its own driver for a reason, that's what it's there for. :-) –  Ti Strga Jan 28 '13 at 21:03
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My comment isn't talking about just linking... that's the point. Even just restricting the discussion to linking (which your answer was not), a user still won't be able to use the entire C++ standard library by only specifying -lstdc++, as there will be missing dependencies on math, RTTI, and exception information. Whether a given test case links or fails will depend on the operating system and which C++ features are used by the test case, which again is why all of that knowledge is built into the g++ driver instead of being left up to the user to figure out. –  Ti Strga Jan 29 '13 at 15:38
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Trust me, we have this discussion a lot, usually when a Linux user tries to move his incomplete Makefile to another platform. :-) The g++ link stage does a lot more than gcc -lstdc++ on other OSes, especially when the target is an embedded platform. Fortunately, that's why we ship a g++ in the first place. –  Ti Strga Jan 29 '13 at 15:40
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The spec strings are constructed to be specific to the compiler, which in turn are specific to the operating system and target. So if you run -dumpspec on (for example) a cross compiler targeting an embedded system, you will see the differences. There are more than just linker differences... which again, is what your answer was about (preprocessor macros, include paths, multiple runtime libraries). We seem to be talking past each other, but as a former GCC maintainer, I assure you I am familiar with what the frontends are and are not. –  Ti Strga Jan 29 '13 at 17:02

For c++ you should use g++.

It's the same compiler (e.g. the GNU compiler collection). GCC or G++ just choose a different front-end with different default options.

In a nutshell: if you use g++ the frontend will tell the linker that you may want to link with the C++ standard libraries. The gcc frontend won't do that (also it could link with them if you pass the right command line options).

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The only notable difference is that i you pass a .c to gcc it will compile as C, whereas g++ will always treat it as C++

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Although the gcc and g++ commands do very similar things, g++ is designed to be the command you'd invoke to compile a C++ program; it's intended to automatically do the right thing.

Behind the scenes, they're really the same program. As I understand, both decide whether to compile a program as C or as C++ based on the filename extension. Both are capable of linking against the C++ standard library, but only g++ does this by default. So if you have a program written in C++ that doesn't happen to need to link against the standard library, gcc will happen to do the right thing; but then, so would g++. So there's really no reason not to use g++ for general C++ development.

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“GCC” is a common shorthand term for the GNU Compiler Collection. This is both the most general name for the compiler, and the name used when the emphasis is on compiling C programs (as the abbreviation formerly stood for “GNU C Compiler”).

When referring to C++ compilation, it is usual to call the compiler “G++”. Since there is only one compiler, it is also accurate to call it “GCC” no matter what the language context; however, the term “G++” is more useful when the emphasis is on compiling C++ programs.

You could read more here: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-3.3.5/gcc/G_002b_002b-and-GCC.html

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gcc does not link the C++ standard libraries by default. You can make it work by passing -lstdc++ to gcc.

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gcc and g ++ are both GNU compiler. They both compile c and c++. The difference is for *.c files gcc treats it as a c program, and g++ sees it as a c ++ program. *.cpp files are considered to be c ++ programs. c++ is a super set of c and the syntax is more strict, so be careful about the suffix.

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