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I got a strange behaviour extending PHP DOMElements:

class JavaScript extends DOMElement {
}

class JavaScriptLibrary extends DOMElement {
}

$dom = new DOMDocument();

$node = new JavaScript('script');
$dom->appendChild($node);

$node = new JavaScriptLibrary('script');
$dom->appendChild($node);

$node = new JavaScript('script');
$dom->appendChild($node);

foreach ($dom->childNodes as $childNode) {
    echo get_class($childNode)."\n";
}

Expected:

JavaScript
JavaScriptLibrary
JavaScript

Result:

DOMElement
DOMElement
JavaScript

What will be happend here?

If I do it this way:

addElement($dom, new JavaScript('script'));
addElement($dom, new JavaScriptLibrary('script'));
addElement($dom, new JavaScript('script'));

function addElement($dom, $node){
    $dom->appendChild($node);
}

The result will be

DOMElement
DOMElement
DOMElement

How can I do this without using ->createElement like here "How can I extend PHP DOMElement?".

share|improve this question
    
looks like always only the last element shows the correct class name – DevZer0 Jun 23 '13 at 11:19
    
In the first example it seems, that $node will hold the reference. If you use $node1, $node2 and $node3 for the three nodes it works. – user2513437 Jun 23 '13 at 11:48
    
But I don't know why the example with the function don't work. There will be no reference. – user2513437 Jun 23 '13 at 11:50
    
+1 Great question. Technically DOMElement is the correct class-name, if you look into the PHP manual, the docs clearly say that you get a sub-type of DOMNode (but not specifically your sub-types). For more details and what you can/could do to change that, see my answer below. – hakre Jun 23 '13 at 15:25
up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all you might wonder what happens here in your first example. Why (the hell ;)) are the first two ones a DOMElement and the third one a JavaScript.

That is because the $node variable has not been re-assigned or unset so far. If you unset or re-assign it, the output differs:

$node = 1; # re-assing to (int) 1

foreach ($dom->childNodes as $childNode) {
    echo get_class($childNode)."\n";
}

Output:

DOMElement
DOMElement
DOMElement

As you can see, the third one now is like the first two ones.

This might already give you a pointer. As long as your DOMNode object is kept in PHP variable-memory, it is of your type. When not and you read it "back" from the parent element or the document (without having it in some variable of yours), it is read from some other memory and returned as a DOMElement.

That means, PHP does not keep numerous DOMElement objects in memory only because the document has that many elements but internally there is some other data-structure and when you interact with DOMDocument, PHP will create these objects on-the-fly (unless that object was already created and still is in variable-memory).

So this should explain why the first two were DOMElement ($node was re-assigned so they were not in PHP-variable-memory any longer) while for the third node, it still was in memory and therefore was not created.

With this explanation, it should also now be more clear where the limitation is: Even though you add a more specific DOMElement node to the document (e.g. JavaScript, JavaScriptLibrary) it must not mean that you get it back from the DOM. Because the DOM only is a model that guarantees giving you back a DOMElement and not "what you stuffed in there".

This structure in memory I've just talked about, where no PHP objects exist but still all elements are represented, is based on a library called libxml. PHP makes use of the these.

So each time PHP creates a new object based on these internal structure for a DOMElement it uses the same-named PHP class.

You can change the class-name here BTW by registering a subclass of a base-class (e.g. DOMDocument as base-class and JavaScriptLibrary as subclass) and then DOMDocument will - when creating a new object instances - use that class instead.

So instead of re-assigning to $node in the example-variation above, we register a different class:

$dom->registerNodeClass('DOMElement', 'JavaScriptLibrary');

foreach ($dom->childNodes as $childNode) {
    echo get_class($childNode)."\n";
}

Output:

JavaScriptLibrary
JavaScriptLibrary
JavaScript

Et voilà!; as long as PHP creates those DOMElements from the internal memory structure, you get it in the registered class, here JavaScriptLibrary.

If this still is too limited for what you want to do, the only way I know of to deal with this is to extend DOMDocument, self-reference it when constructed (so this object does not get lost), subclass any other node-type, for any adding, keep the object you've added in memory so that it does return "as-is" like you experienced with the third one.

If you want to develop that fast, I suggest you make use of a PHP 5.4 feature called traits as even most of those domdocument-extension-classes extend from DOMNode, you can not for your own sub-classes, they need to extend from their base-class otherwise this won't work. As PHP does not have multiple inheritance, traits can help here to not duplicate write code between all the many sub-classes you will need to create for your instance/object management.

Also good knowledge about the DOMDocument-Model is recommended so that you understand how nodes are added and removed so that you can manage the memory. I can not say if it's worth the work or even 100% possible for what you try to do.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried registerNodeClass also. But it seems, that this is a global setting. I can't change the class on the fly. If I do, all stored elements will be overridden by the last definition. I think cause how you said that the DOM is "only a model". But what can I do? What I want is – how the class name says – to create a DOM with script-tags. The JavaScriptLibrary will always inserted before JavaScript elements. For this I have a special document class which will manage this. – user2513437 Jun 23 '13 at 16:06
    
Yes, as explained, it is one setting for all objects that are (re-) created. As I further wrote you either need to keep those objects you create in memory (that is for example having an array and adding those nodes there, too (keep an eye what happens with the memory you consume)) or change that setting when those are re-created. As long as you keep those concrete objects in memory, their type is retained. The key is that you understand why that happens so that you can build something that fits your need. Very rough array example/demo: eval.in/34657 – hakre Jun 23 '13 at 16:59
    
That's it! Thanks! – user2513437 Jun 23 '13 at 17:35
    
Only it does "work" must not mean that this is it. Take care you might use the DOM for something it has not been designed for. Just saying. Backup in case eval.in goes down: gist.github.com/hakre/5845868 – hakre Jun 23 '13 at 17:45

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