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I'm relatively new to C++ programming. I'm studying how do classes work, and I have a problem with the following code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class time
{
public:
time();
void settime (int, int, int);
void printuniversal ();
void printstandard ();
private:
int hour;
int minute;
int second;
};

time::time()
{
hour = minute = second = 0;
}

void time::settime (int h, int m, int s)
{
hour = (h >= 0 && h < 24) ? h : 0;
minute = (m >= 0 && m < 60) ? m : 0;
second = (s >= 0 && s < 60) ? s : 0;
}

void time::printuniversal()
{
cout << hour << ":" << minute << ":" << second << ":" << endl;
}

void time::printstandard()
{
cout << ((hour == 0 || hour == 12) ? 12 : hour % 12) << ":" << minute << ":" << second                             << (hour < 12 ? "AM" : "PM") << endl;
}

int main ()
{
time t;
cout << "Initial universal time: " << t.printuniversal();
cout << "\nInitial standard time: " << t.printstandard();
t.settime(13,27,6);
cout << "\nNew universal time: " << t.printuniversal();
cout << "\nNew standard time: " << t.printstandard();
return 0;
}

The mistake I get is: classi.cpp:42:6: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘t’ classi.cpp:43:39: error: ‘t’ was not declared in this scope

Is there something I didn't quite understand about classes? Why doesn't it recognize t a a "time" variable?

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4  
You should avoid using namespace std. There is something called std::time, which could clash with your time class. This is probably not the problem here, but better not invite those kinds of problems. –  juanchopanza Jun 23 '13 at 13:58
    
Yes, rename the class to something less generic first, to eliminate the possibility of name clash. –  Stabledog Jun 23 '13 at 13:59
3  
Actually, I believe @juanchopanza hit the nail on the head. I renamed time to xtime, and it stopped complaining about that line (instead it complains about the result of a void function being passed to cout. –  Mats Petersson Jun 23 '13 at 14:00
1  
@MatsPetersson Ha ha, so many times I have said "don't use using namespace std, not even in .cpp files, I get into these silly fights with people who claim it is perfectly fine to do so. I even thought of starting a blog with counter examples... :-) –  juanchopanza Jun 23 '13 at 14:03
    
At first when starting out with C++ I fell into the using namespace ... construct but now, 20 years later, I'm definitely for NOT using the using namespace std, it makes it so much easier to read the code, plus makes the code compile more cleanly (avoiding name clashes as above) –  Robert Jun 23 '13 at 16:03
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3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

This should teach you not to have nasty using directives such as:

using namespace std;

And especially not at namespace scope (even worse if in header files). There is a function in the standard library called std::time(), whose name is clashing with the name of your type.

This ambiguity can be solved by using the class keyword in the declaration of t:

class time t;

However, a much better way would be to remove the using directive and qualify the names of entities from the standard namespace, thus writing (for instance):

   std::cout << "Initial universal time: "
// ^^^^^

Notice, that this may not be enough, since library implementations are allowed to put entities from the C standard library in the global namespace. In this case, removing the nasty using directive would not help resolving the ambiguity.

Therefore, I would also suggest avoiding to give your own entities (types, functions, variables, ...) the same name as entities from the standard library, or to put them in your own namespace at least.

Moreover, expressions such as:

cout << "Initial universal time: " << t.printuniversal();
//                                 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
//                                 printuniversal() returns void! 

Are ill-formed, since printuniversal() returns void. You should just do:

cout << "Initial universal time: ";
t.printuniversal();

The same applies of course to all similar expressions

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This worked greately, thank you. I told you I still am quite a newbie when it comes to programming. :) I wasn't aware of the fact that using namespace std could cause clashes. –  Andrea De Pace Jun 23 '13 at 14:08
    
@AndreaDePace: We've all be there ;) Glad it helped –  Andy Prowl Jun 23 '13 at 14:10
    
@AndyProwl Checked here, it doesn't look time is a word you can freely use for a class name after including <iostream>. –  Antonio Jun 23 '13 at 14:24
1  
@Antonio: That's probably because that implementation is putting time() in the global namespace as well (this is not required, but permitted). Anyway, as I mentioned in the answer, it is indeed preferable to avoid giving your entities names that clash with the names of entities from the standard library –  Andy Prowl Jun 23 '13 at 14:26
    
@AndyProwl I wonder for which reason it is permitted... :) –  Antonio Jun 23 '13 at 14:30
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You shouldn't name your class time, or you should avoid using using namespace std. Instead, you can do statements like using std::cout, using std::endl, etc. I personally never use "using", always leave std::, it makes easier my searches in the source code.

Anyway, I checked here, removing using namespace std doesn't really help (see discussion above). Play safe and change name to the class. Anyway, the above suggestions stay.

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An alternative to removing the "using namespace std" directive is to place your code in a namespace to avoid clashing names. This can be done as follows:

namespace time_utils
{
    class time
    {
    public:
        time();
        void settime (int, int, int);
        void printuniversal ();
        void printstandard ();
    private:
        int hour;
        int minute;
        int second;
    };
};

time_utils::time::time()
{
    hour = minute = second = 0;
}

The purpose of namespaces is to avoid clashing names.

Later on there are compilation errors when calling functions in the cout stream, so you can split them up like so:

int main ()
{
    my_code::time t;
    cout << "Initial universal time: ";
    t.printuniversal();
    cout << "\nInitial standard time: ";
    t.printstandard();
    t.settime(13,27,6);
    cout << "\nNew universal time: ";
    t.printuniversal();
    cout << "\nNew standard time: ";
    t.printstandard();
    return 0;
}

That's because those functions are returning void. The alternative there is to have those functions return std::string instead.

Hope this offers an alternative insight.

Cheers,

Simon.

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