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I am new to Cryptogrphy, HTTPS and SSL !!! If i am not wrong , the private key of an End Entity certificate (certificate issued by trusted CA like Verisign) is used to decrypt the information sent by the client ! But does a root certificate also have a Private Key?

If Yes, then I wanted to know where exactly the private key of a root certificate is used? What happens if it is leaked ?

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3 Answers 3

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If I am not wrong, the private key of an End Entity certificate (certificate issued by trusted CA like Verisign) is used to decrypt the information sent by the client

You are wrong. It isn't. The peer's own private key is used to sign the certificate so the client can verify that the peer owns the certificate he presents, and the private key of signing certificates is used to, err, sign certificates.

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I assume that by "peer" you are referring to the holder of the End entity certificate. –  user2048204 Jun 24 '13 at 8:39
    
Which Certificate does the peer sign???? –  user2048204 Jun 24 '13 at 19:01
    
@user2048204 The signature is computed over the entire certificate chain that he sends, actually, and a few other things too, but the signature is sent separately. It's. It the same thing as the signature in the certificate, which is computed by the signing CA. –  EJP May 12 '14 at 18:24

The root certificate's private key is (normally) only used to sign the intermediate certificates. Compromising it allows you to create new intermediate certificates, and by extension, certificates for any domain.

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Ok , so can i say that Every certificate has a digital signature, and this digital signature is created by using the Private Key of its Issuing Certificate? –  user2048204 Jun 23 '13 at 17:12

A root certificate is the top-most certificate of the tree, the private key of which is used to "sign" other certificates. All certificates immediately below the root certificate inherit the trustworthiness of the root certificate - a signature by a root certificate is somewhat analogous to "notarizing" an identity in the physical world. If you knew the private key, you could create new (counterfeit) certificates.

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Ok , so can i say that Every certificate has a digital signature, and this digital signature is created by using the Private Key of its Issuing Certificate? –  user2048204 Jun 23 '13 at 17:09
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@user2048204 that's right –  djf Jun 23 '13 at 17:10

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