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I have a C string that looks like "Nmy stringP", where N and P can be any character. How can I edit it into "my string" in C?

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1  
Homework? Add the "homework" tag if it is. –  pmg Nov 13 '09 at 0:10
    
No, not homework- just trying to learn C for fun. –  igul222 Nov 13 '09 at 0:18
1  
In pure C there is no such thing as a "string". Do you have a pointer to a buffer (char *) or a character array (char[])? –  Mark Elliot Nov 13 '09 at 0:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

To "remove" the 1st character point to the second character:

char mystr[] = "Nmy stringP";
char *p = mystr;
p++; /* 'N' is not in `p` */

To remove the last character replace it with a '\0'

p[strlen(p)-1] = 0; /* 'P' is not in `p` (and it isn't in `mystr` either) */
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2  
This may not work because by initializing "Nmy stringP" as a literal, the compiler/linker can place it in read only memory, causing the edit to fail. –  Suppressingfire Nov 13 '09 at 0:14
6  
@Suppressingfire: "Nmy stringP" is indeed a literal string, but it is copied (char by char) to the array mystr. The array mystr is modifiable. –  pmg Nov 13 '09 at 0:17
1  
The literal string is copied to the location of the variable named "mystr". mystr is not a pointer to the literal, it's a copy of the literal. –  Bryan Oakley Nov 13 '09 at 0:26
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strdup() is not a Standard function. Its workings, on those implementations that offer it as an extension, may be different from implementation to implementation. I prefer to malloc() and strcpy() when needed. It wasn't needed to demonstrate how to remove the first and last chars of a string. –  pmg Nov 13 '09 at 0:32
3  
mystr is not a pointer, it is an array initialized with the contents of a string literal. The code he has is correct. –  Brian R. Bondy Nov 13 '09 at 0:32

Another option, again assuming that "edit" means you want to modify in place:

void topntail(char *str) {
    size_t len = strlen(str);
    assert(len >= 2); // or whatever you want to do with short strings
    memmove(str, str+1, len-2);
    str[len-2] = 0;
}

This modifies the string in place, without generating a new address as pmg's solution does. Not that there's anything wrong with pmg's answer, but in some cases it's not what you want.

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Further to @pmg's answer, note that you can do both operations in one statement:

char mystr[] = "Nmy stringP";
char *p = mystr;
p++[strlen(p)-1] = 0;

This will likely work as expected but behavior is undefined in C standard.

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It's best though not to rely on undefined behavior. –  T0xicCode Dec 8 '12 at 21:52
1  
@xav0989 Agreed, I intended to add that more as a comment (to highlight the reason not to do that), not as an alternative answer. I'm a bit new at this. –  Will Daniels Dec 10 '12 at 15:43

The most efficient way:

//Note destroys the original string by removing it's last char
// Do not pass in a string literal.
char * getAllButFirstAndLast(char *input)
{
  int len = strlen(input); 
  if(len > 0)
    input++;//Go past the first char
  if(len > 1)
    input[len - 2] = '\0';//Replace the last char with a null termination
  return input;
}


//...
//Call it like so
char str[512];
strcpy(str, "hello world");
char *pMod = getAllButFirstAndLast(str);

The safest way:

void getAllButFirstAndLast(const char *input, char *output)
{
  int len = strlen(input);
  if(len > 0)
    strcpy(output, ++input);
  if(len > 1)
    output[len - 2] = '\0';
}


//...
//Call it like so
char mod[512];
getAllButFirstAndLast("hello world", mod);

The second way is less efficient but it is safer because you can pass in string literals into input. You could also use strdup for the second way if you didn't want to implement it yourself.

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The problem I see with your second implementation is that you need to make sure your output is large enough to handle the copy before you call getAllBufFirstAndLast(). In this case, I would recommend adding an outputLength variable to the call and let the called function manipulate output with strn* functions. –  shank Nov 13 '09 at 14:10
    
yes that's a precondition, yup you can add a length parameter. –  Brian R. Bondy Nov 13 '09 at 14:11

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