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How can I access the array from within block in Ruby?

For example:

[1,2,3].each{|e| puts THEWHOLEARRAY.inspect }

Where THEWHOLEARRAY should return [1,2,3].

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you are seeking is either tap, already implemented:

[1, 2, 3].tap { |ary|
  puts ary.inspect
  ary.each { |e|
    # ...
  }
  'hello' ' ' + 'world' # return value demo
} # returns the original array

Or ergo method, coming soon:

class Object; def ergo; yield self end end # gotta define it manually as of Ruby 2.0.0
[1, 2, 3].ergo { |ary|
  puts ary.inspect
  ary.each { |e|
    # ...
  }
  'hello' ' ' + 'world' # return value demo
} # returns the block return value
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Amazing here is that during the day I saw this tap quite a few times and wanted to find out more :-) –  Ilya Novojilov Jun 23 '13 at 17:41
    
+1 ... nice answer... –  Arup Rakshit Jun 23 '13 at 17:48
    
@IlyaNovojilov: Functional programming and tap is the new fad nowadays. –  Boris Stitnicky Jun 23 '13 at 18:20

You cannot. The block variable only holds information about a single element for each iteration. It does not have information of the whole array. Furthermore, each will iterate as many times as the number of the elements in the array. Do you want to inspect that many times? It does not make sense.

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1  
Actually the task is to select elements of the array which are like some other array element and return element if there are no similar elements. Like: [ {title:'h1',value:'ttt'}, {title:'h2',value:'h2'}, {title:'h1',category:5,value:'needs to be returned instead instead of first one} ] What is the better way to do this? –  Ilya Novojilov Jun 23 '13 at 17:48

It's not exactly clear what you want to do. Do you mean something like this?:

THEWHOLEARRAY = [1,2,3]
THEWHOLEAREAY.each{ |e|
  puts THEWHOLEARRAY.inspect
}

Ruby lets you access variables outside a block. Typically it would be another variable, not the one you are iterating over though.

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