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I need to create a graph in Pylab in which I will plot colored points along the Y axis. The y axis goes from 0 to 100. I also have a list of 100 elements, and the elements are either +1 or -1. This list has to correspond with the Y axis of the graph.

For instance, if the fifth element in the list is +1, I need to plot a green dot on y=5 on the Y axis. if the fifth element in the list is -1, the point has to be red.

I have to do this for all elements in the list.

I have graphed simple graphs in Pylab, but I am totally lost in this case. Any help will be appreciated. Thanks!!

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1 Answer 1

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

data = np.array([1,1,-1,-1,1])
cmap = np.array([(1,0,0), (0,1,0)])
uniqdata, idx = np.unique(data, return_inverse=True)

N = len(data)
fig, ax = plt.subplots()
plt.scatter(np.zeros(N), np.arange(1, N+1), s=100, c=cmap[idx])
plt.grid()
plt.show()

yields

enter image description here


Explanation:

If you print out np.unique(data, return_inverse=True), you'll see it returns a tuple of arrays:

In [71]: np.unique(data, return_inverse=True)
Out[71]: (array([-1,  1]), array([1, 1, 0, 0, 1]))

The first array says the unique values in data is -1 and 1. The second array assigns the value 0 wherever data is -1 and the value 1 wherever data is 1. Essentially, np.unique allows us to transform [1,1,-1,-1,1] to [1, 1, 0, 0, 1]. Now cmap[idx] is an array of RGB values:

In [74]: cmap[idx]
Out[74]: 
array([[0, 1, 0],
       [0, 1, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [0, 1, 0]])

This is an application of so-called "fancy indexing" on NumPy arrays. cmap[0] is the first row of cmap. cmap[1] is the second row of cmap. cmap[idx] is an array such that the ith element in cmap[idx] is cmap[idx[i]]. So, you end up with cmap[idx] being a 2D-array where the ith row is cmap[idx[i]]. Thus cmap[idx] can be thought of as a sequence of RGB color values.


If you have more than one set of dots and you wish to plot them in columns, the simplest way I can think of is to call ax.scatter once for each list of data:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

def plot_data(ax, data, xval):
    N = len(data)
    uniqdata, idx = np.unique(data, return_inverse=True)
    ax.scatter(np.ones(N)*xval, np.arange(1, N+1), s=100, c=cmap[idx])

cmap = np.array([(1,0,0), (0,1,0)])
fig, ax = plt.subplots()

data = np.array([1,1,-1,-1,1])
data2 = np.array([1,-1,1,1,-1])

plot_data(ax, data, 0)
plot_data(ax, data2, 1)

plt.grid()
plt.show()

enter image description here

The nice thing about this is that it is relatively easy to understand. The bad thing about this is that it calls ax.scatter more than once. If you have lots of data sets it is more efficient to collate your data and call ax.scatter once. This is faster for Matplotlib, but its a little more complicated to code:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import itertools as IT

def plot_dots(ax, datasets):
    N = sum(len(data) for data in datasets)
    x = np.fromiter(
        (i for i, data in enumerate(datasets) for j in np.arange(len(data))),
        dtype='float', count=N)
    y = np.fromiter(
        (j for data in datasets for j in np.arange(1, len(data)+1)),
        dtype='float', count=N)
    c = np.fromiter(
        (val for data in datasets
         for rgb in cmap[np.unique(data, return_inverse=True)[-1]]
         for val in rgb),
        dtype='float', count=3*N).reshape(-1,3)
    ax.scatter(x, y, s=100, c=c)

cmap = np.array([(1,0,0), (0,1,0)])
fig, ax = plt.subplots()

N = 100
datasets = [np.random.randint(2, size=5) for i in range(N)]

plot_dots(ax, datasets)

plt.grid()
plt.show()

enter image description here


References:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much!! I was trying to do something like this in Pylab, but I kept getting something else –  user2509830 Jun 23 '13 at 17:56
    
One more quick question for my own reference. So cmap is for the color, right? Also, what is numpy.unique() telling python to do? –  user2509830 Jun 23 '13 at 19:29
    
Finally, if i wanted to graph another list the same way so that those dots are a bit farther away from the first set of dots, how do I do that? It keeps graphing the first set of dots two times –  user2509830 Jun 23 '13 at 19:52
    
I've added an explanation of how cmap works. –  unutbu Jun 23 '13 at 20:18
    
Thanks a lot. I understand it now. I am now trying to graph another set of dots that correspond to another list on the same graph (spaced away from the first set of dots). The first set of dots is graphed two times. How can I fix this? –  user2509830 Jun 23 '13 at 20:22

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