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Given a std::tuple, e.g.:

std::tuple<int, float, char>

I'd like to generate a type like this:

std::tuple<std::vector<int>, std::vector<float>, std::vector<char>>

as you can see, is a tuple of vectors of original types. here's the standard scenario:

typedef std::tuple<int, float, char>    Struct;          // scenario 1
typedef std::vector<Struct>             ArrayOfStructs;  // scenario 2
typedef HereIsTheQuestion<Struct>::Type StructOfArrays;  // scenario 3

Scenario 1 is intended to be accessed like this:

Struct x = ...; // single tuple
std::get<0>(x) = 11;
// etc.

Scenario 2 is intended to be accessed like this:

ArrayOfStructs xs = ...; // array of tuples
for (size_t i=0; i<xs.size(); ++i) {
    std::get<0>(xs[i]) = 11;
    // etc.
}

Scenario 3 is intended to be accessed like this:

StructsOfArrays xs = ...; // single tuple of arrays
size_t n = std::get<0>(xs).size(); // first tuple array size
for (size_t i=0; i<n; ++i) {
    std::get<0>(xs)[i] = 11;
    // etc.
}

How must HereIsTheQuestion::Type be written to resemble a tuple of arrays from the original Struct type?

Thanks, m.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Here is how HereIsTheQuestion should be implemented.

template<typename T>       //primary template
struct HereIsTheQuestion;  //leave it undefined

template<typename ...T>
struct HereIsTheQuestion<std::tuple<T...>>  //partial specialization
{
    using Type = std::tuple<std::vector<T>...>;
};

Now

HereIsTheQuestion<std::tuple<int, float, char>>::Type

is

std::tuple<std::vector<int>,std::vector<float>, std::vector<char>>

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
does this also work on empty tuples? –  spattija Jun 23 '13 at 18:29
    
@spattija: Yes, empty tuple will yield empty tuple for ::Type, that is, HereIsTheQuestion<std::tuple<>>::Type would be std::tuple<>. –  Nawaz Jun 23 '13 at 18:30
    
As for my ignorance, I wrote BlahBlah<...>::Type, do you think it is needed? I mean, can HereIsTheQuestion<...tuple...>::Type be replaced with HereIsTheQuestion<std::tuple<>> ? (without an internal typedef, --> ::Type) ? –  spattija Jun 23 '13 at 18:36
    
@spattija: I don't get what you're saying. Please write your code on ideone.com, and give me the link. –  Nawaz Jun 23 '13 at 18:38

You can use this template to create the type:

namespace detail
{
    template <typename... Ts>
    struct tuple_change { };

    template <typename... Ts>
    struct tuple_change<std::tuple<Ts...>>
    {
        using type = std::tuple<std::vector<Ts>...>;
    };
}

And create an index sequence like this:

namespace detail
{
    template <int... Is>
    struct index { };

    template <int N, int... Is>
    struct gen_seq : gen_seq<N - 1, N - 1, Is...> { };

    template <int... Is>
    struct gen_seq<0, Is...> : index<Is...> { };
}

You also need a template to allow printing of the tuple:

template <typename... Ts, int... Is>
static void print(std::tuple<Ts...>& var, detail::index<Is...>)
{
    auto l = { (print(std::get<Is>(var)), 0)... };
    (void)l;
}

template <typename... Ts>
static void print(std::tuple<Ts...>& var)
{
    print(var, detail::gen_seq<sizeof...(Ts)>{});
}

template <typename T>
static void print(std::vector<T>& v)
{
    for (auto a : v)
    {
        std::cout << std::boolalpha << a << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

After that it becomes simple. Here is your program:

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <vector>

namespace detail
{
    template <typename... Ts>
    struct tuple_change { };

    template <typename... Ts>
    struct tuple_change<std::tuple<Ts...>>
    {
        using type = std::tuple<std::vector<Ts>...>;
    };

    template <int... Is>
    struct index { };

    template <int N, int... Is>
    struct gen_seq : gen_seq<N - 1, N - 1, Is...> { };

    template <int... Is>
    struct gen_seq<0, Is...> : index<Is...> { };
}

template <typename... Args, int... Is>
void fill(std::tuple<Args...>& var, detail::index<Is...>)
{
    auto l = { (std::get<Is>(var).assign(5, 11), 0)... };
    // here I just decided to make the size 5
    (void)l;
}

template <typename... Args>
void fill(std::tuple<Args...>& var)
{
    fill(var, detail::gen_seq<sizeof...(Args)>{});
}

template <typename T>
static void print(std::vector<T>& v)
{
    for (auto a : v)
    {
        std::cout << std::boolalpha << a << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

template <typename... Ts, int... Is>
static void print(std::tuple<Ts...>& var, detail::index<Is...>)
{
    auto l = { (print(std::get<Is>(var)), 0)... };
    (void)l;
}

template <typename... Ts>
static void print(std::tuple<Ts...>& var)
{
    print(var, detail::gen_seq<sizeof...(Ts)>{});
}

using result_type = detail::tuple_change<std::tuple<int, bool>>::type;

int main()
{
    result_type r;

    fill(r);
    print(r);
}

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, but this solution seems to be outside my intent –  spattija Jun 23 '13 at 18:37
    
@spattija What is your intent? You have three different scenarios and I'm not sure what you want done. –  0x499602D2 Jun 23 '13 at 18:40
1  
@spattija Did you not want to change it into a tuple of vectors? That's what I did here. I also included a way to print the tuple with a demo. –  0x499602D2 Jun 23 '13 at 19:17

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