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Started playing with configured objects in JavaScript and something is causing me a few issues.

Check out this code:

function Monster() {
}

function Animal() {
  Object.defineProperty(this, "name", {
    set: function(n) {  },
    get: function() { return "Jim"; } // hard-coded to demonstrate problem
  });
}

Monster.prototype = new Animal();

var monster = new Monster();
monster.name = "John";
monster.name // Still returns Jim. I need to assign the property to THIS object, so Jim is shadowed by John.

As the comment says, this is outputting "Jim", as the getter is hard-coded to return.

I don't want to change my prototype everytime I call monster.name - I want a NEW shadowed property on my monster instance. How can I manage that?

share|improve this question
1  
You're trying to use prototypical inheritance to override a per instance property on the base class. It won't work. –  Alnitak Jun 23 '13 at 19:14
    
So is there no way to assign monster.name without it being eaten by the prototype's definition? I don't want to change my prototype unless I directly try to modify monster.__proto__.name - otherwise I'd expect monster.name to point to a property on this object, not my proto. –  JJJ Jun 23 '13 at 19:24
    
Was my answer helpful to you? It shows how to reassign the name without changing the prototype's definition. –  amadeus Jun 25 '13 at 17:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make the property configurable:

function Animal() {
  Object.defineProperty(this, "name", {
    configurable: true,
    set: function(n) {  },
    get: function() { return "Jim"; } // hard-coded to demonstrate problem
  });
}

Monster.prototype = new Animal();

var monster = new Monster();
Object.defineProperty(monster, 'name', {writable: true})
monster.name = "John";
monster.name
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't possibly in my example, but it does solve the shadowing issue. –  JJJ Jun 26 '13 at 18:04
    
So I'll accept it as the correct answer. Thanks! –  JJJ Jun 26 '13 at 18:04

You hardcoded "Jim" in your getter function, so it will always return "Jim" not matter what. You need to store the value of your property in a local variable and also get it from there:

function Animal() {
  var myName = "Jim";
  Object.defineProperty(this, "name", {
    set: function(n) { myName = n },
    get: function() { return myName; }
  });
}

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer
    
Virtually exactly what I thought, +1 for posting before I could even start writing. –  Fabrício Matté Jun 23 '13 at 19:14
    
Thanks for the post. But that was intentional to demonstrate how the property isn't being shadowed correctly when I try to override it in my subclass. –  JJJ Jun 23 '13 at 19:15
    
As I said, if you write literally return "Jim";, then this will always be the value of your property and it actually doesn't demonstrate anything. I'm not sure if I fully understand what you want but if you define your property the way I suggested, you can simply create Monster instances and change their name value. See updated fiddle. –  basilikum Jun 23 '13 at 19:41
    
If animal wasn't using defineProperty to create its property, then a NEW property would be assigned to my monster instance - shadowing the property animal has and thus not modifying my Animal prototype when I make changes to my monster instance. Your answer simply assumes I've made a silly mistake with the defineProperty function. –  JJJ Jun 26 '13 at 18:03
    
@JJJ You can use defineProperty. In fact, I still use it in my answer and I never said you should omit that. I still don't get what is wrong with my answer. Besides that I wrongly assumed that you made a mistake by writing return "John", it successfully modifies the property of the Animal as you wanted it, or not? Did you try the fiddle? –  basilikum Jun 26 '13 at 18:22

I'm not entirely sure how you expect it to work. After all, your setter does nothing and your getter returns a constant.

Why not just do this?

function Animal() {
    this.name = "Jim";
}

Then you can do:

var monster = new Monster();
monster.name = "John";
monster.name // John
share|improve this answer
1  
"Be able to know when a property is set/changed" –  Fabrício Matté Jun 23 '13 at 19:11
    
It's a contrived example to demonstrate how the property isn't being shadowed correctly. The lack of property shadowing is the issue I'm having. I need to use a define because I need to listen for changes to the property. –  JJJ Jun 23 '13 at 19:12

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