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I have an object like this:

var source = (function(undefined) {
    var o;
    function s(o) {
        if(!o || typeof o === 'object') {
            o = o || {};
            o.a = typeof o.a === 'string' ? o.a : 'A';
            o.b = typeof o.b === 'string' ? o.b : 'B';
            this.o = o;
        }
    }
    s.prototype.v = function() {
        // some function
    };
    s.prototype.x = function() {
        // some function
    };
    return s;
})();

I want to use another similar to extend the first.

var extender = (function(undefined) {
    var o;
    function e(o) {
        if(!o || typeof o === 'object') {
            o = o || {};
            o.c = typeof o.c === 'number' ? o.c : 3;
            o.d = typeof o.d === 'number' ? o.d : 4;
            this.o = o;
        }
    }
    e.prototype.y = function(m) {
        // some function
    };
    e.prototype.z = function(m) {
        // some function
    };
    return e;
})();

I can add this.s = new source(o); to the function and with some small changes to my second object can tie everything into the first but I was thinking there might be a better way.

share|improve this question
    
Why on earth would you call your variable undefined? That's one of the most evil things you can do in Javascript. –  Antimony Jun 23 '13 at 21:53
3  
@Antimony: No; he's creating a local undefined variable in case someone else sets window.undefined. jQuery does this. –  SLaks Jun 23 '13 at 21:56
    
Why would that be a problem? And wtf why should somebody set window.undefined? –  Sascha Gehlich Jun 23 '13 at 22:26
    
No idea why someone would do it. But it is a good practice to avoid problems. The code I posted here is just a sample. The real code has some validations that require undefined to be UNDEFINED. –  tntu Jun 23 '13 at 22:34
    
@SLaks Oh, that's a neat trick. –  Antimony Jun 24 '13 at 2:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To combine the snippets from the other two answers to the correct solution, you probably want

var extender = (function(undefined) {
    // var o; - That's useless, `o` is a parameter of the constructor
    function e(o) {
        source.call(this, o); // invoke the `source` constructor on this instance
        o = this.o; // and get the created `o` object
        // …to extend it:
        o.c = typeof o.c === 'number' ? o.c : 3;
        o.d = typeof o.d === 'number' ? o.d : 4;
    }

    // make the prototype a new object inheriting `v` and `x`:
    e.prototype = Object.create(source.prototype);
    // then extend it
    e.prototype.y = function(m) {
        …
    };
    e.prototype.z = function(m) {
        …
    };
    return e;
})();

See docs for Object.create and call.

share|improve this answer
    
Uh, I didn't. Gonna comment on it :-) –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 18:15
    
@tntu: No it's not. It would create a whole instance, and invoke the constructor - yet without any parameters (which would not be meaningful). You only want the inheritance, creating instance things (in the constructor) which are shared by all extender objects can create serious issues. –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 18:24
    
Then both would point to the same object and you would create y and z on source.prototype basically. There's nothing wrong with using the common and old shim for Object.create to make it work smoothly in older browsers –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 18:29
    
Thank you for the effort. You win :) Feel free to remove you comments to leave this question tidy. –  tntu Jun 24 '13 at 19:19
    
@tntu: Why "tidy"? I know that my post was not really comprehensive, and many things not well explained. The responses on your extra questions are part of my answer, and can still help others to understand the topic (which might work better if the questions were still there :-) –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 21:05

You can use:-

Object.create(o);//where o is object to inherit from

For cross browser:-

 if (typeof Object.create !== "function")
            Object.create = function(o) {
                function F() {}
                F.prototype = o;
                return new F();
 };
share|improve this answer
    
Is there an else? –  tntu Jun 23 '13 at 21:55
    
Nope. Object.create is new object function for creating a new object from the object passed to it. Modern browsers have support of this. The "if" is for the browsers not having this support. –  pvnarula Jun 23 '13 at 21:58
    
Is there a solution for all browsers? Plus I need to tap into the source object from inside the main function of the second. I need to be able to pass the initialization parameter to the extender and from ti to the source. –  tntu Jun 23 '13 at 22:04
    
The "if" is for cross browser implementation. You can send arguments to Object.create(); For more info:- developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… –  pvnarula Jun 23 '13 at 22:05
    
What do I do in the else case? –  tntu Jun 23 '13 at 22:13

Check out the following two lines:

e.prototype = source.prototype;

source.call(this, o);

They are the solution.

Of course I had to make some adjustments to the config in order to ensure both operate.

var source = (function(undefined) {
    function s(o) {
        // config
        this.o = {};
        if(!o || typeof o === 'object') {
            o = o || {};
            this.o.a = typeof o.a === 'string' ? o.a : 'A';
            this.o.b = typeof o.b === 'string' ? o.b : 'B';
        }
    }
    s.prototype.x = function(m) {
        console.log(m);
    };
    return s;
})();
var extender = (function(undefined) {
    function e(o) {
        // instanciate parent
        source.call(this, o);
        // child config
        if(!o || typeof o === 'object') {
            o = o || {};
            e = this.o;
            e.c = typeof o.c === 'number' ? o.c : 1;
            e.d = typeof o.d === 'number' ? o.d : 2;
        }
    }
    // inherit
    e.prototype = source.prototype;
    // extend
    e.prototype.y = function(m) {
        console.log(m);
    };
    return e;
})();
var e = new extender({d:3});
console.log(e);
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think source.call(o) is a solution. Did you notice it creates the o property (with the a and b subproperties) on the o parameter which you passed, instead of the result object (this inside the e constructor)? –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 18:17
    
Also notice that you should not use new for the prototype object creation. In your case you might even get issues with nested objects –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 18:21
    
Try to log source.prototype.y and be surprised :-) –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 18:33
    
You want y to be only on extender.prototype, but v and x on both? If you assign them to each other, there will be only one object - and all properties be everywhere. –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 18:39
    
That is what I want. It is not a problem. Thank you for explaining. Now I know the difference between yours and mine. You could say yours inherits and mine extends. –  tntu Jun 24 '13 at 18:47

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