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I have this line of code which rounds my numbers to 2 decimal places. But the thing is I get numbers like this. 10.8, 2.4 etc. These are not my idea of 2 decimal places so how I can improve this:

Math.round(price*Math.pow(10,2))/Math.pow(10,2);

I want numbers like 10.80, 2.40 etc. Use of JQuery is fine with me.

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12 Answers 12

up vote 401 down vote accepted

To format a number using fixed-point notation, you can simply use the toFixed method:

(10.8).toFixed(2); // 10.80

var num = 2.4;
alert(num.toFixed(2)); // 2.40
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11  
Doesn't work consistently across all browsers, ie (0.09).toFixed(1); gives 0.0 in IE8 –  ajbeaven Oct 10 '11 at 22:55
29  
fixed doesn't round, you can do it first: (Math.round(0.09)).toFixed(1); –  rekans Jan 20 '12 at 11:02
16  
@rekans: This is wrong. Math.Round(0.09) will return 0 so this will always give 0.0... –  Chris May 11 '12 at 10:33
14  
This is a bad idea in most situations, it converts the number to a string or float point number in some cases. –  Ash Blue Jun 20 '12 at 15:19
38  
Have to agree with @AshBlue here... this is only safe for formatting presentation of values. May break code with further calculations. Otherwise Math.round(value*100)/100 works better for 2DP. –  UpTheCreek Aug 2 '12 at 6:11

I usually add this to my personal library, and after some suggestions and using the @TIMINeutron solution too, and making it adaptable for decimal length then, this one fits best:

 function precise_round(num, decimals) {
var t=Math.pow(10, decimals);   
 return (Math.round((num * t) + (decimals>0?1:0)*(Math.sign(num) * (10 / Math.pow(100, decimals)))) / t).toFixed(decimals);
    }

will work for the exceptions reported.

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2  
precise_round(1.275,2) is 1.27? –  allenhwkim Mar 14 '13 at 4:25
    
precise_round(6,2) returns 6 (no decimals as asked in the question) –  Imre Apr 10 '13 at 12:41
2  
@Imre Change the return value to (Math.round(num*Math.pow(10,decimals))/Math.pow(10,decimals)).toFixed(2); and you will no longer have that issue. –  dkroy Aug 7 '13 at 8:26
    
@dkroy Nice idea, although the argument for toFixed(...) should be decimals, as in the answer by @TIMINeutron –  Imre Aug 7 '13 at 9:52
6  
where do you declare "sign" and "dec" if your second function is picked up as is shouldn't it have them as undefined? –  forthehackofit Jan 28 at 18:44

I don't know why can't I add a comment to a previous answer (maybe I'm hopelessly blind, dunno), but I came up with a solution using @Miguel's answer:

function precise_round(num,decimals){
return Math.round(num*Math.pow(10,decimals))/Math.pow(10,decimals);
}

And its two comments (from @bighostkim and @Imre):

  • Problem with precise_round(1.275,2) not returning 1.28
  • Problem with precise_round(6,2) not returning 6.00 (as he wanted).

My final solution is as follows:

function precise_round(num,decimals){
    var sign = num >= 0 ? 1 : -1;
    return (Math.round((num*Math.pow(10,decimals))+(sign*0.001))/Math.pow(10,decimals)).toFixed(decimals);
}

As you can see I had to add a little bit of "correction" (it's not what it is, but since Math.round is lossy - you can check it on jsfiddle.net - this is the only way I knew how to "fix" it). It adds 0.001 to the already padded number, so it is adding a 1 three 0s to the right of the decimal value. So it should be safe to use.

After that I added .toFixed(decimal) to always output the number in the correct format (with the right amount of decimals).

So that's pretty much it. Use it well ;)

EDIT: added functionality to the "correction" of negative numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
The "correction" is mostly safe, but e.g. precise_round(1.27499,2) now also returns 1.28... It's not Math.round that is lossy; the way that computers internally store floating point values is. Basically, you're doomed to fail with some values before the data even gets to your function :) –  Imre Aug 7 '13 at 10:12
    
@Imre, you're absolutelly right. That's why I explain what is this 0.001 doing there, in case anyone wants to make it "more precise" or even delete it (if you happen to have a super computer with 2 Mbytes per float, wich I don't think anyone here does ;) –  TIMINeutron Aug 30 '13 at 19:56
    
Actually, the language specification is pretty specific about using 64 bits for number values, so having/using a supercomputer wouldn't change anything :) –  Imre Sep 4 '13 at 7:58
    
for the 0.001 you can replace by adding many zeros according to length of the decimals. so.. –  Miguel Oct 26 '13 at 22:13

toFixed(n) provides n length after the decimal point; toPrecision(x) provides x total length.

Use this method below

// Example: toPrecision(4) when the number has 7 digits (3 before, 4 after)
    // It will round to the tenths place
    num = 500.2349;
    result = num.toPrecision(4); // result will equal 500.2

AND if you want the number to be fixed use

result = num.toFixed(2);
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it does not work well... for number num = 50.2349 you should write toPrecision(3) to get 50.2 –  Piotr Czyż May 14 at 7:51
    
its just an example you can change it as per your need @PiotrCzyż –  Syed Umar Ahmed May 14 at 11:15

This is an old topic but still top-ranked Google results and the solutions offered share the same floating point decimals issue. Here is the (very generic) function I use, thanks to MDN:

function round(value, exp) {
  if (typeof exp === 'undefined' || +exp === 0)
    return Math.round(value);

  value = +value;
  exp  = +exp;

  if (isNaN(value) || !(typeof exp === 'number' && exp % 1 === 0))
    return NaN;

  // Shift
  value = value.toString().split('e');
  value = Math.round(+(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] + exp) : exp)));

  // Shift back
  value = value.toString().split('e');
  return +(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] - exp) : -exp));
}

As we can see, we don't get these issues:

round(1.275, 2);   // Returns 1.28
round(1.27499, 2); // Returns 1.27

This genericity also provides some cool stuff:

round(1234.5678, -2);   // Returns 1200
round(1.2345678e+2, 2); // Returns 123.46
round("123.45");        // Returns 123

Now, to answer the OP's question, one has to type:

round(10.8034, 2).toFixed(2); // Returns "10.80"
round(10.8, 2).toFixed(2);    // Returns "10.80"

Or, for a more concise, less generic function:

function round2Fixed(value) {
  value = +value;

  if (isNaN(value))
    return NaN;

  // Shift
  value = value.toString().split('e');
  value = Math.round(+(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] + 2) : 2)));

  // Shift back
  value = value.toString().split('e');
  return (+(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] - 2) : -2))).toFixed(2);
}

You can call it with:

round2Fixed(10.8034); // Returns "10.80"
round2Fixed(10.8);    // Returns "10.80"
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I didn't find an accurate solution for this problem, so i created my own.

function inprecise_round(value, decPlaces) {
  return Math.round(value*Math.pow(10,decPlaces))/Math.pow(10,decPlaces);
}

function precise_round(value, decPlaces){
    var val = value * Math.pow(10, decPlaces);
    var fraction = (Math.round((val-parseInt(val))*10)/10);

    //this line is for consistency with .NET Decimal.Round behavior
    // -342.055 => -342.06
    if(fraction == -0.5) fraction = -0.6;

    val = Math.round(parseInt(val) + fraction) / Math.pow(10, decPlaces);
    return val;
}

//this may produce different results depending on the browser environment
342.055.toFixed(2) // 342.06 on Chrome & IE10

inprecise_round(342.055, 2) // 342.05
precise_round(342.055, 2) // 342.06
precise_round(-342.055, 2) // -342.06
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2  
Thanks. Here's a ditty to test this: jsfiddle.net/lamarant/ySXuF. I'm applying toFixed() to the value prior to returning it which appends the correct number of zeroes to the end of the returned value. –  lamarant Jul 7 '13 at 18:27

@heridev and I created a small function in jQuery.

You can try next:

HTML

<input type="text" name="one" class="two-digits"><br>
<input type="text" name="two" class="two-digits">​

jQuery

// apply the two-digits behaviour to elements with 'two-digits' as their class
$( function() {
    $('.two-digits').keyup(function(){
        if($(this).val().indexOf('.')!=-1){         
            if($(this).val().split(".")[1].length > 2){                
                if( isNaN( parseFloat( this.value ) ) ) return;
                this.value = parseFloat(this.value).toFixed(2);
            }  
         }            
         return this; //for chaining
    });
});

​ DEMO ONLINE:

http://jsfiddle.net/c4Wqn/

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7  
Too complicated... –  Adrian Salazar May 17 '13 at 13:56
    
I can appreciate the contribution, though I think adding DOM elements and jQuery into the mix seems out of the scope of the question. –  Chris May Sep 5 '13 at 11:58

Maybe you want to include a sprintf library for JavaScript.

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The trouble with floating point values is that they are trying to represent an infinite amount of (continuous) values with a fixed amount of bits. So naturally, there must be some loss in play, and you're going to be bitten with some values.

When a computer stores 1.275 as a floating point value, it won't actually remember whether it was 1.275 or 1.27499999999999993, or even 1.27500000000000002. These values should give different results after rounding to two decimals, but they won't, since for computer they look exactly the same after storing as floating point values, and there's no way to restore the lost data. Any further calculations will only accumulate such imprecision.

So, if precision matters, you have to avoid floating point values from the start. The simplest options are to

  • use a devoted library
  • use strings for storing and passing around the values (accompanied by string operations)
  • use integers (e.g. you could be passing around the amount of hundredths of your actual value, e.g. amount in cents instead of amount in dollars)

For example, when using integers to store the number of hundredths, the function for finding the actual value is quite simple:

function descale(num, decimals) {
    var hasMinus = num < 0;
    var numString = Math.abs(num).toString();
    var precedingZeroes = '';
    for (var i = numString.length; i <= decimals; i++) {
        precedingZeroes += '0';
    }
    numString = precedingZeroes + numString;
    return (hasMinus ? '-' : '') 
        + numString.substr(0, numString.length-decimals) 
        + '.' 
        + numString.substr(numString.length-decimals);
}

alert(descale(127, 2));

With strings, you'll need rounding, but it's still manageable:

function precise_round(num, decimals) {
    var parts = num.split('.');
    var hasMinus = parts.length > 0 && parts[0].length > 0 && parts[0].charAt(0) == '-';
    var integralPart = parts.length == 0 ? '0' : (hasMinus ? parts[0].substr(1) : parts[0]);
    var decimalPart = parts.length > 1 ? parts[1] : '';
    if (decimalPart.length > decimals) {
        var roundOffNumber = decimalPart.charAt(decimals);
        decimalPart = decimalPart.substr(0, decimals);
        if ('56789'.indexOf(roundOffNumber) > -1) {
            var numbers = integralPart + decimalPart;
            var i = numbers.length;
            var trailingZeroes = '';
            var justOneAndTrailingZeroes = true;
            do {
                i--;
                var roundedNumber = '1234567890'.charAt(parseInt(numbers.charAt(i)));
                if (roundedNumber === '0') {
                    trailingZeroes += '0';
                } else {
                    numbers = numbers.substr(0, i) + roundedNumber + trailingZeroes;
                    justOneAndTrailingZeroes = false;
                    break;
                }
            } while (i > 0);
            if (justOneAndTrailingZeroes) {
                numbers = '1' + trailingZeroes;
            }
            integralPart = numbers.substr(0, numbers.length - decimals);
            decimalPart = numbers.substr(numbers.length - decimals);
        }
    } else {
        for (var i = decimalPart.length; i < decimals; i++) {
            decimalPart += '0';
        }
    }
    return (hasMinus ? '-' : '') + integralPart + (decimals > 0 ? '.' + decimalPart : '');
}

alert(precise_round('1.275', 2));
alert(precise_round('1.27499999999999993', 2));

Note that this function rounds to nearest, ties away from zero, while IEEE 754 recommends rounding to nearest, ties to even as the default behavior for floating point operations. Such modifications are left as an exercise for the reader :)

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One way to be 100% sure that you get a number with 2 decimals:

(Math.round(num*100)/100).toFixed(2)
share|improve this answer
    
This is the best, simplest way to do it. However, due to floating point math, 1.275 * 100 = 127.49999999999999, which could cause minor errors in the rounding. To fix this, we can multiply by 1000 and divide by 10, as (1.275 * 1000)/10 = 127.5. As follows: var answer = (Math.round((num * 1000)/10)/100).toFixed(2); –  James G. Jun 13 at 19:36

Here's a simple one

function roundFloat(num,dec){
    var d = 1;
    for (var i=0; i<dec; i++){
        d += "0";
    }
    return Math.round(num * d) / d;
}

Use like alert(roundFloat(1.79209243929,4));

Jsfiddle

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Put the following in some global scope:

Number.prototype.getDecimals = function ( decDigCount ) {
   return this.toFixed(decDigCount);
}

and then try:

var a = 56.23232323;
a.getDecimals(2); // will return 56.23

Update

Note that toFixed() can only work for the number of decimals between 0-20 i.e. a.getDecimals(25) may generate a javascript error, so to accomodate that you may add some additional check i.e.

Number.prototype.getDecimals = function ( decDigCount ) {
   return ( decDigCount > 20 ) ? this : this.toFixed(decDigCount);
}
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