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A slightly altered version of the below permitted me to filter unique field values out of a multi-dimensional table ( dictionarry style )

[ url ] http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Remove_duplicate_elements#Lua

items = {1,2,3,4,1,2,3,4,"bird","cat","dog","dog","bird"}`
flags = {}
io.write('Unique items are:')
for i=1,#items do
if not flags[items[i]] then
  io.write(' ' .. items[i])
  flags[items[i]] = true
end
end
io.write('\n')`

What i'm lost at is what 'if not ... then ... end' part actually does. To me this is sillyspeak but hey, it works ;-) Now i want to know what happens under the hood.

I hope multi-dimensional does not offend anyone, i'm referring to a table consisting of multiple row containing multiple key-value pairs on each row.

Here's the code i'm using, no brilliant adaptation but good enough to filter unique values on a fieldname

 for i=1,#table,1 do 

 if not table2[table[i].fieldname] then
    table2[table[i].fieldname] = true 
 end 
 end

 for k,v in pairs(table2) do
     print(k)
 end
share|improve this question
    
It seems you have answered your own question with an edit. Please make it an answer and accept it. –  Tom Blodget Jun 24 '13 at 1:24
1  
Don't use table as a variable name. –  hjpotter92 Jun 24 '13 at 2:06
    
@hjpotter92 i use table to illustrate the code, as i do with fieldname –  Saint Crusty Jun 24 '13 at 8:09
1  
it's perfectly fine to use table as a variable name. Just keep in mind that you can't access the global table.* functions if you do. –  dualed Jun 25 '13 at 21:13
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted
function findDuplicates(t)
    seen = {} --keep record of elements we've seen
    duplicated = {} --keep a record of duplicated elements
    for i = 1, #t do
        element = t[i]  
        if seen[element] then  --check if we've seen the element before
            duplicated[element] = true --if we have then it must be a duplicate! add to a table to keep track of this
        else
            seen[element] = true -- set the element to seen
        end
    end 
    return duplicated
end 

The logic behind the if seen[element] then, is that we check if we've already seen the element before in the table. As if they key doesn't exist nill will be returned which is evaluated which is false (this is not the same as boolean false, there are two types of false in lua!).

You can use this function like so:

t = {'a','b','a','c','c','c','d'}
for key,_ in pairs(findDuplicates(t)) do
    print(key)
end 

However that function won't work with multidimensional tables, this one will however:

function findDuplicates(t)
    seen = {} --keep record of elements we've seen
    duplicated = {} --keep a record of duplicated elements
    local function traverse(subt)
        for i=1, #subt do
            element = subt[i]
            if type(element) == 'table' then
                traverse(element)
            else
                if seen[element] then 
                    duplicated[element] = true
                else
                    seen[element] = true
                end 
            end 
        end 
    end
    traverse(t)
    return duplicated
end 

Example useage:

t = {'a',{'b','a'},'c',{'c',{'c'}},'d'}
for k,_ in pairs(findDuplicates(t)) do
    print(k)
end 

Outputs

a
c

t = {a='a',b='b',c='c',d='c',e='a',f='d'}

function findDuplicates(t)
    seen = {}
    duplicated = {}
    for key,val in pairs(t) do
        if seen[val] then
            duplicated[val] = true
        else
            seen[val] = true
        end 
    end 
    return duplicated
end 

This works the same way as before but checks if the same value is associated with a different key and if so, makes note of that value as being duplicated.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. I'm a novice programmer so i over-used the multi-dimensional wording here. I'm still getting used to the raw power lua offers ;-) At times it seems hard to control ;-) My table looks like { { field1 = "value1", field2 = "value2",....,field9 = "value9" },</br> { field1 = "value1", field2 = "value2",....,field9 = "value9" } .... } –  Saint Crusty Jun 24 '13 at 8:13
    
@SaintCrusty no worries. Lua was my first language :) It was really frustrating at times. Understanding tables is actually quite hard, it seems easy once you do though but I know I struggled quite a bit. That and metatables! Stick with it though :) If this answered your Q you should consider accepting it. Oh I'll update my answer accordingly! –  HennyH Jun 24 '13 at 8:16
    
@SaintCrusty is that better now? –  HennyH Jun 24 '13 at 8:20
    
I'm new here so bear with me to address the requirements ;-) Tables are indeed quite a challenge, i've not dared look at metatables. Still, these concepts do seem ingenious and practical. –  Saint Crusty Jun 24 '13 at 10:21
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