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I am writing a multithreaded socket application in Python.

Here's some basic skeleton code for what I have:

import socket, threading, time

class listener:

    def __init__(self):
        # Create a local listener socket
        self.socket = socket.socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM)
        # Set options
        self.socket.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
    def start(self):
        # Start listening for incoming connections in a loop. As connections
        # come in, start new threads and accept/work with them.
        self.socket.bind(('',1001)) # Bind to all addresses
        while (True):
            self.socket.listen(1) # blocks until a new connection is available
            newSocket, addr = self.socket.accept() # Accept connection
            thisConnThread = threading.Thread(target=server().runServer, args=( newSocket, addr ) )
            thisConnThread.start() # call the connection handler on a new thread
            # now return and listen for more connections.

class server:
    def RunServer(self, socket, addr):
        socket.write("Hello world!\n")
        # Create a thread to listen for input from the client
        thisListenThread = threading.Thread(target=self.RunServer_Listener, args=(socket.) )
        thisListenThread.start()
        # To demonstrate async - print a value every so many seconds - this 
        # needs to happen separately from the listener.
        for i in range(0,100):
            socket.write("Checkpoint!\n")
            time.sleep(60)
        socket.write("Your time is UP! Bye!\n")
        socket.shutdown(socket.SHUTDOWN_RDWR) # close the connection

    def RunServer_Listener(self, socket):
        while (True):
            inData = socket.read(4096) # blocks until data arrives
            if not inData:
                break # connection must be closed
            socket.write("You wrote: %s\n" % inData)

What I'd expect to happen in this case is that each time a connection comes in, a new instance of server would be created and a new thread would be spawned to run it.

In other words, the line thisConnThread = threading.Thread(target=server().runServer, args=( newSocket, addr ) ) to me should be creating a new instance of server and then executing the function contained therein.

I setup a separate listener thread because on the actual server, the server may need to send data to the client at any time, but it also needs to respond to the client at any time. Since read() blocks until data is available, it made sense to me to create a listening thread that waits for input from the client and then processes it, but the main connection thread can still do what it needs to do and write to the client independent of the listener.

If I have a single connection to this server, this works exactly as expected.

However, if I connect a second client to the server, strange things begin to happen. The most important and most concerning is that if I type into the second instance's client, sometimes the reply will go to the second instance, and sometimes to the FIRST instance, and vice versa. It is almost as if the write() operation is doing some sort of round-robin thing - it goes to each instance alternately.

For this exercise there really isn't a need to keep like a list of active connections. That amy be for a later or more advanced project, but for now, the clients simply live out their time on the server and then go away and the server doesn't have any reason to interact with the other connections.

I'm sure I'm missing something here, maybe my implementation of threading is wrong or maybe my use of sockets is completely wrong. Either way, does anyone have some advice as to how to make the connections to the server completely independent of each other?

share|improve this question
2  
Your code can't actually work as you've posted it. For example, you attempt to start server().runServer in a thread, but that method does not exist (only RunServer). And the args you pass to RunServer_Listener are socket. which is a SyntaxError... Another problem with your code is that you call listen() more than once on the same socket. It should only be called once per listening socket. –  Celada Jun 24 '13 at 1:10
    
I actually don't understand why it shouldn't have this behavior of switching between threads. Which instance responds would just be based on whichever thread was active at that moment. How is the code meant to distinguish between the two clients? –  David Robinson Jun 24 '13 at 1:10
    
@DavidRobinson, well, each thread is working with its own private socket. That part shouldn't really be a problem. –  Celada Jun 24 '13 at 1:12
    
You also should not call your variable socket because this local variable shadows the global value of socket, which is the socket module. Call is s or sock or socket_ or really ANYTHING else, but not socket. You have at least one bug that is caused by this confusion: the shutdown call can't work, because socket.SHUTDOWN_RDWR does not exist (it's an attribute of the socket module, not of your socket local variable). –  Celada Jun 24 '13 at 1:14
    
Yeah, for my pseudo example I did some copy/paste from different parts of my code, so there were quite a few semantic errors. My apologies... –  fdmillion Jun 24 '13 at 1:43

1 Answer 1

After making a bunch of more or less obvious fixes, your code seems to work fine for me in Python 2.7. Here's the patch (note, I changed the port number too, and sped up the timeouts and such).

(Did not add appropriate join or setDaemon calls, did not seem worth doing for this.)

diff --git a/fdmillion.py b/fdmillion.py
index 8109c83..1362d3d 100644
--- a/fdmillion.py
+++ b/fdmillion.py
@@ -1,40 +1,44 @@
 import socket, threading, time
+from socket import AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM

 class listener:

     def __init__(self):
         # Create a local listener socket
-        self.socket = socket.socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM)
+        self.sock = socket.socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM)
         # Set options
-        self.socket.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
+        self.sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
     def start(self):
         # Start listening for incoming connections in a loop. As connections
         # come in, start new threads and accept/work with them.
-        self.socket.bind(('',1001)) # Bind to all addresses
+        self.sock.bind(('',8001)) # Bind to all addresses
         while (True):
-            self.socket.listen(1) # blocks until a new connection is available
-            newSocket, addr = self.socket.accept() # Accept connection
-            thisConnThread = threading.Thread(target=server().runServer, args=(  newSocket, addr ) )
+            self.sock.listen(1) # blocks until a new connection is available
+            newSocket, addr = self.sock.accept() # Accept connection
+            thisConnThread = threading.Thread(target=server().RunServer, args=(  newSocket, addr ) )
             thisConnThread.start() # call the connection handler on a new thread
             # now return and listen for more connections.

 class server:
-    def RunServer(self, socket, addr):
-        socket.write("Hello world!\n")
+    def RunServer(self, sock, addr):
+        sock.sendall("Hello world!\n")
         # Create a thread to listen for input from the client
-        thisListenThread = threading.Thread(target=self.RunServer_Listener, args=(socket.) )
+        thisListenThread = threading.Thread(target=self.RunServer_Listener, args=(sock,) )
         thisListenThread.start()
         # To demonstrate async - print a value every so many seconds - this 
         # needs to happen separately from the listener.
-        for i in range(0,100):
-            socket.write("Checkpoint!\n")
-            time.sleep(60)
-        socket.write("Your time is UP! Bye!\n")
-        socket.shutdown(socket.SHUTDOWN_RDWR) # close the connection
+        for i in range(5,0,-1):
+            sock.sendall("Checkpoint! %d...\n" % i)
+            time.sleep(5)
+        sock.sendall("Your time is UP! Bye!\n")
+        sock.shutdown(socket.SHUT_RDWR) # close the connection

-    def RunServer_Listener(self, socket):
+    def RunServer_Listener(self, sock):
         while (True):
-            inData = socket.read(4096) # blocks until data arrives
+            inData = sock.recv(4096) # blocks until data arrives
             if not inData:
                 break # connection must be closed
-            socket.write("You wrote: %s\n" % inData)
+            sock.sendall("You wrote: %s\n" % inData)
+
+if __name__ == '__main__':
+    listener().start()

[edited to fix long lines cut off by diff output going through less]

share|improve this answer
    
(btw @Celada's comment about only doing one listen is reasonable, but it's OK to call listen again to change the backlog value, at least on FreeBSD. Have not tested this on Linux.) –  torek Jun 24 '13 at 1:36

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