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What is the efficient way to read elements into a list and keep the list sorted apart from searching the place for a new element in the existing sorted list and inserting in there?

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The pythonic way of sorting a list is just my_list.sort() –  Aswin Murugesh Jun 24 '13 at 2:29
    
Yes but do you keep on doing my_list.append(new_element) and then my_list.sort() each time? –  vkaul11 Jun 24 '13 at 2:30
    
But sorting after insertion of every element hikes your algo's time by a lot. Sorting is not as easy as you think –  Aswin Murugesh Jun 24 '13 at 2:34

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@Aswin's comment is interesting. If you are sorting each time you insert an item, the call to sort() is O(n) rather than the usual O(n*log(n)). This is due to the way the sort(timsort) is implemented.

However on top of this, you'd need to shift a bunch of elements along the list to make space. This is also O(n), so overall - calling .sort() each time is O(n)

There isn't a way to keep a sorted list in better than O(n), because this shifting is always needed.

If you don't need an actual list, the heapq (as mentioned in @Ignacio's answer) often covers the properties you do need in an efficient manner.

Otherwise you can probably find one of the many tree data structures will suit your cause better than a list.

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Actually, heapq uses a list underneath. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 24 '13 at 3:15
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams, yes, but the list contains a heap structure which is manipulated by the heapq functions, it doesn't need to shuffle as much to insert a element. –  John La Rooy - AKA gnibbler Jun 24 '13 at 3:44

Use a specialised data structure, in Python you have the bisect module at your disposal:

This module provides support for maintaining a list in sorted order without having to sort the list after each insertion. For long lists of items with expensive comparison operations, this can be an improvement over the more common approach. The module is called bisect because it uses a basic bisection algorithm to do its work.

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The bisect part is useful (O(log(n))), but the insertions will still be O(n) –  John La Rooy - AKA gnibbler Jun 24 '13 at 3:02

You're looking for the functions in heapq.

This module provides an implementation of the heap queue algorithm, also known as the priority queue algorithm.

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But it will only keep the minimum of the maximum and have a tree like structure right? How do I keep a sorted list using heapq. I do know the algorithm to keep a running median using two heaps, but how does one use a heap to keep the entire list sorted as it is created? –  vkaul11 Jun 24 '13 at 2:32
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"But it will only keep the minimum of the maximum and have a tree like structure right?" No. "How do I keep a sorted list using heapq. I do know the algorithm to keep a running median using two heaps, but how does one use a heap to keep the entire list sorted as it is created?" Like the linked docs say, use heapq.heappush(). –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 24 '13 at 2:34
    
So basically, you are saying keep on pushing all elements in the heap and then pop all the elements from the heap like in heapsort? def heapsort(iterable): ... 'Equivalent to sorted(iterable)' ... h = [] ... for value in iterable: ... heappush(h, value) ... return [heappop(h) for i in range(len(h))] ... >>> heapsort([1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 2, 4, 6, 8, 0]) [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] –  vkaul11 Jun 24 '13 at 4:44

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