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So I have a private messages model which has the columns: sender_id, recipient_id, content, and created_at.

I want to select the last 5 recipients I have messaged. However, I can't figure out how to narrow down the columns.

My current query is this:

SELECT DISTINCT recipient_id, created_at FROM private_messages WHERE sender_id = :user_id ORDER BY created_at DESC LIMIT 5

I can't get rid of the created_at column since it's necessary for the ORDER BY. I must be missing something, but I'm not entirely sure what it is.

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I figured out a really hacky alternative way of doing it using subqueries. For anyone wondering, this is what I did: SELECT DISTINCT recipient_id FROM (SELECT recipient_id FROM private_messages WHERE sender_id = :user_id ORDER BY created_at DESC) AS recipients LIMIT 5 –  Dasun Jun 24 '13 at 4:34

6 Answers 6

....I can't get rid of the created_at column since it's necessary for the ORDER BY.

No.

A column in Order By cluase is not necessary to be present in SELECT column list. You can omit created_at column in SELECT list of your query . Rest of your query will work fine.

Check this SQL FIDDLE where above fact is shown.

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weird, I took out the DISTINCT and created_at and it works just fine. However, when I add the DISTINCT back in, I get this error: PG::Error: ERROR: for SELECT DISTINCT, ORDER BY expressions must appear in select list –  Dasun Jun 24 '13 at 4:28
    
For your requirement as mentioned in question , distinct is not required... –  mmhasannn Jun 24 '13 at 4:30
    
Not entirely sure if that's correct, I could have messaged the same user 5 times. Without the distinct, I would get that recipient_id 5 times. –  Dasun Jun 24 '13 at 4:32
    
ok I see .. let me try –  mmhasannn Jun 24 '13 at 4:33
    
sorry man .. i can't think of better solution than yours.. –  mmhasannn Jun 24 '13 at 4:51

Have you tried something like the below:

SELECT TOP 5  recipient_id
FROM private_messages 
WHERE sender_id = :user_id 
GROUP BY recipient_id
ORDER BY created_at DESC

I believe you don't need created_at in your select to use it in an order by clause. This might depend on which database system you are using tho, in SQL server it will allow this.

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I'm using PostGreSQL.. Syntax error: PG::Error: ERROR: syntax error at or near "5" –  Dasun Jun 24 '13 at 3:58
    
yeah in PostGreSQL remove the top 5 and add the limit 5 back in at the end. –  JanR Jun 24 '13 at 4:00
    
Same error as the other response: column "private_messages.created_at" must appear in the GROUP BY clause or be used in an aggregate function –  Dasun Jun 24 '13 at 4:24

try this: SELECT DISTINCT recipient_id, created_at FROM private_messages WHERE sender_id = :user_id GROUP BY recipient_id ORDER BY created_at DESC LIMIT 5

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I get this error: column "private_messages.created_at" must appear in the GROUP BY clause or be used in an aggregate function –  Dasun Jun 24 '13 at 3:57
    
distinct and group by will do the same thing in this situation, and if you do a group by you will have to group by id and date in your example –  JanR Jun 24 '13 at 4:01
    
try removing distinct since group by clause is used –  passion Jun 24 '13 at 4:03

try: SELECT recipient_id FROM(SELECT recipient_id,MAX(created_at) as created_at FROM private_messages WHERE sender_id = :user_id GROUP BY recipient_id)a ORDER BY created_at DESC LIMIT 5;

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You can't omit the column. This has been added to the SQL standard some time ago.

for SELECT DISTINCT, ORDER BY expressions must appear in select list

Quoted from here (message from Tom Lane.)

there's actually a definitional reason for it. Consider

SELECT DISTINCT x FROM tab ORDER BY y;

For any particular x-value in the table there might be many different y
values. Which one will you use to sort that x-value in the output?

Back in SQL92 they avoided this problem by specifying that ORDER BY
entries had to reference output columns. SQL99 has some messy verbiage that I think comes out at the same place as our restriction

For example, Oracle does not enforce this rule (10g or 11g).

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Try this

 WITH t AS ( SELECT max(created_at) AS created_at, recipient_id  FROM messages 
 GROUP BY recipient_id  )

 SELECT created_at, recipient_id   FROM t ORDER BY created_at DESC LIMIT 5  
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