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I am creating/rebuilding a new system from a very outdated one, and am in the process of creating the schema that will be used in the new system. The tables need some serious work for normalization.

The customer table I working with has a lot of repeated data in it:

  • Some customers are related in that they have the same "Parent Company". For example, a supply company like Graybar Electric has many branches around the US. In this customer table, each of these branches are listed as separate customers, like "Graybar Electric - Seattle". The branch in Spokane is listed as "Graybar Electric - Spokane".
  • A customer has one billing address, but a billing address can be for one or more customers. If a billing address is related to more than one customer, those customers are always from the same "Parent Company"
  • However, branches from a parent company don't necessarily share the same billing address. For example, "Stoneway Electric - Seattle" might have a different billing address than "Stoneway Electric-Everett", but might share billing address with "Stoneway Electric - Tacoma".
  • Not all customers are branches, they are their own individual company/customer, so they don't have a "Parent Company".

Here is a quick visual of what I explained above:

Customer Name        |   Billing Address
--------------------------------------
CustomerA - Branch1  |  BillingAddress1
CustomerA - Branch2  |  BillingAddress1
CustomerA - Branch3  |  BillingAddress2
CustomerA - Branch4  |  BillingAddress3
CustomerB - Branch1  |  BillingAddress4
CustomerB - Branch2  |  BillingAddress4
CustomerC            |  BillingAddress5
CustomerD            |  BillingAddress6
etc....

So, I think I want tables: ParentCompany, Customer, and BillingAddress. But where I am unsure about is how to relate the 3 tables. The choices as I see them are:

  1. ParentCompany to Customer (1:M) and then Customer to Billing Address (M:1)
  2. ParentCompany to BillingAddress (1:M) and then BillingAddress to Customer (1:M)

In making my choice, I am trying to consider which will be easier to implement in the user interface with forms. I would need to consider:

  • Add a customer branch for an existing parent company
  • Add a customer branch for a parent company that doesn't exist yet.
  • Add a customer that isn't a branch of a parent company.
  • When adding a branch customers, the user would select an existing billing address related to the parent company or enter a new billing address.
  • An existing single customer wants to add a branch customer, so now both the new customer and the original single customer would need to relate to the new parent company.

So my questions are:

  1. What schema will work best for my situation?
  2. Are there pros/cons for each of the above options that I need to consider?
  3. Are there any other options or considerations that I am missing?

Thanks for your input.

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So, I think I want tables: ParentCompany, Customer, and BillingAddress. But where I am unsure about is how to relate the 3 tables.

You're going about it backwards.

You have customers. Some of these customers have parent companies.

Each company has a billing address. Many companies may share a billing address.

So let's start with customers and billing addresses.

Customer
--------
Customer ID
Customer Name
Billing Address ID
...

Billing Address
---------------
Billing Address ID
Billing Address Line 1
Billing Address Line 2
Billing Address City
Billing Address State
Billing Address Zip
... 

Now, what happens when we introduce a parent company? We don't want to change the relationship between customers and billing addresses. Since not every company has a parent company, we make the parent company a child class of Customer.

Parent Company
--------------
Parent Company ID
Parent Company Name
...

Parent Company / Customer
-------------------------
Customer ID
Parent Company ID
Billing Address ID

The key to the relationship table is all 3 ID fields. You can have other unique keys if you want to get at the relationships by the parent company ID or the billing address ID.

So let's test out this schema.

Add a customer branch for an existing parent company

Add a row to the Customer table and a row to the Parent Company / Customer table. The billing address ID in the Parent Company / Customer table supersedes the billing address ID in the Customer table. Your application code needs to ensure this.

Add a customer branch for a parent company that doesn't exist yet.

Add a row to the Parent Company table. Add a row to the Customer table. Add a row to the Parent Company / Customer table.

Add a customer that isn't a branch of a parent company.

Add a row to the Customer table.

When adding branch customers, the user would select an existing billing address related to the parent company or enter a new billing address.

That's a GUI related question, but you select all the billing address from the Parent Company / Customer table for a parent company, and the user can either select one or type in a new billing address. You'll need a unique index on the Parent Company / Customer table on (Parent Company ID, Billing Address ID, Customer ID) to make the select efficient.

An existing single customer wants to add a branch customer, so now both the new customer and the original single customer would need to relate to the new parent company.

Add a Customer table row. Add a Parent Company table row. Add two rows to the Parent Company / Customer table to make the associations. Update the original customer row on the Customer table if necessary.

Good luck with your database revisions.

Edited to answer the questions in the comments.

Can you please explain more about the Parent Company / Customer table? Is this table going to be in a relationship between the Customer and the Parent Company table?

This table associates the parent company and the customer. Wikipedia calls it a junction table. It exists to tie the parent company and the customer together.

And what is the cardinality between the 3 tables?

There will be one row on the Parent Company / Customer table for every parent company / customer association.

Also, can you please elaborate on your statement: "The key to the relationship table is all 3 ID fields. You can have other unique keys if you want to get at the relationships by the parent company ID or the billing address ID. " Is there other keys to consider?

I used the word key to mean index. Sorry if that caused you confusion.

The primary (clustering) index is (Customer ID, Parent Company ID, Billing Address ID).

You also need a unique index on (Parent Company ID, Billing Address ID, Customer ID) for the GUI address screen you outlined.

Depending on what else you want to query on, you would need additional unique indexes.

You can define 4 more unique indexes. There are 6 unique indexes that can be made from 3 key columns. This is called the Cartesian product.

When you have an SQL select on the Parent Company / Customer table that runs really slow, you look at the where clause. This usually indicates that you need a new index on the table, and the where clause shows you what columns to put in the index.

Finally, this is an answer to a question. This is not a tutorial. I cannot hold your hand and guide you through the study of data modelling. I suggest you study the Wikipedia article on database normalization.

share|improve this answer
    
I hadn't thought of your suggestion. Can you please explain more about the ParentCompany/Customer table? I am drawing a blank. Is this table going to be in a relationship between the Customer and the ParentCompany table? And what is the cardinality between the 3 tables? Also, can you please elaborate on your statement: "The key to the relationship table is all 3 ID fields. You can have other unique keys if you want to get at the relationships by the parent company ID or the billing address ID. " Is there other keys to consider? Thanks. – Tonya Jun 25 '13 at 4:34

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