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I'm working with some JS code that I inherited on a project, and in several instances it has loops set up like this one:

while(text = someBufferObject.read()) {
  //do stuff with text
}

I'm assuming this is to achieve some sort of do-while type functionality. However, when I run this through JSLINT it complains that it "Expected a conditional expression and instead saw an assignment."

Is there a more accepted approach that I should use for these loops? I'm not sure if something like below is the best way or not:

text = someBufferObject.read()
while(text) {
  //do stuff with text
  text = someBufferObject.read()
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Is there a more accepted approach

Don't take JSLint's advice as gospel. It is dogmatic opinion from a cranky old man; some of it entirely sensible, some of it rather questionable.

while (variable= assignment), though it might sometimes be a mistaken comparator, is also a widely-understood idiom of C-like languages. Whether you use that approach or another is a matter of taste, something you should weigh up personally rather than blindly accept Crockford's edict.

JavaScript does have a do-while loop, so if your test is consistently at the end that would be a more appropriate construct:

do {
    text= someBufferObject.read();
    // do something
} while (text);

More commonly though what you're looking at is a mid-test loop. You may or may not prefer the break idiom as used by Python:

while (true) {
    text= someBufferObject.read();
    if (!text)
        break;
    // do something
}
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Thanks! I should have remembered the true JS do-while. I'll have to look again at the specific cases in my code and decide my semantic prefs pragmatically. –  Duncan Johnson Nov 13 '09 at 4:32
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You only need to wrap it in another set of parentheses to make JSLint happy.

while((text = someBufferObject.read())) {
  //do stuff with text
}
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that's pretty sneaky. I'd probably want to comment the need for double-quotes; if the build requires JSLint no-errors (at a particular) level, f'r instance, I can see why this would have to stay in the code. –  Michael Paulukonis Nov 13 '09 at 19:48
    
This is actually mentioned by the JSLint author as the way to work around it. oreilly.com/javascript/excerpts/javascript-good-parts/… "If you really intend an assignment, wrap it in another set of parentheses" –  Steven Huwig Nov 14 '09 at 1:43
3  
this doesn't appear to be the case in the latest versions of JSLint - it will still detect it –  James Crowley Apr 21 '11 at 14:56
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I can only imagine that's a problem with JSLINT, that's completely valid javascript, it's a lot better than the second solution anyway.

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See if JSLINT complains about this:

while (NULL != (text = someBufferObject.read())) {
  //do stuff with text
}
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3  
wow, that's much worse than the original. Obfuscating code to satisfy a lint? weak –  bobince Nov 13 '09 at 3:00
    
I agree it's worse, but not that it is much worse. Certainly the other alternatives are "much worse." –  wallyk Nov 13 '09 at 3:03
    
+1 for making me laugh at the obfuscation. Depending on the options you set, LINT does/does not complain because you used != instead of !== –  Duncan Johnson Nov 13 '09 at 4:28
    
Back in the dark ages of C compilers (c. 1985), I used some braindead compiler which essentially forced the construct above. Otherwise a compile would be a deluge of useless warnings. –  wallyk Nov 13 '09 at 5:10
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Neither example is a "do-while", they're just different code styles that essentially do the same thing. JSLint is simply informing you that the first style goes against best practices.

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Any suggestions how I can conform to best practices? I'm happy with it as it is in the first example, but I'm curious what would be considered "best practice" :) –  Duncan Johnson Nov 13 '09 at 2:58
    
It's like OtherMichael said, it's a "code smell" - a style that, while syntactically valid, can be the source of bugs if you're not careful. In general, the best practice would be that your loop control should only test, not assign. With that said, 95% of programmers would do it the first way anyway; it's not an error to ignore JSLint - the tool is just there to bring it to your attention but you don't have to follow their advice 100% of the time. –  GalacticCowboy Nov 13 '09 at 12:43
    
You might even be able to tell JSLint to ignore this rule. But like it says on the JSLint site, "Warning: JSLint will hurt your feelings." –  GalacticCowboy Nov 13 '09 at 12:50
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JSLint is complaining because it's a JavaScript code-smell -- using a single-equals (assignment operator) instead of double- or tripe-equals (equality/identity operator) is a common mistake.

If your code works, don't sweat the warning. It's an automated tool, not an omniscient tool.

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