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I delete my old question and reformulate the question here. Can I achieve following function using template instead?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

#define FUNC(T1, T2)  do {cout<< T1.T2<<endl; } while(0);

struct ST{
    double t1;
    int t2;
    double t3;
};

struct ST2{
    int t1;
    double h2;
};


int main()
{
    ST st;
    ST2 st2;
    st.t1 = 1.1;
    st.t2 = 0;
    st.t3 = 3.3;
    FUNC(st, t1);
    FUNC(st, t2);
    FUNC(st, t3);
    FUNC(st2, h2);
}
share|improve this question
    
Why use macros? – Mark Garcia Jun 24 '13 at 5:26
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't think you can do anything with that exact syntax. But you can get something close with member pointers and a function template:

template <typename T, typename Q>
void print(T& var, Q T::* mem)
{
    cout << var.*mem << endl;
}

Use:

print(st, &ST::t1);
print(st, &ST::t2);
print(st2, &ST2::h2);

Note that st2.h2 is uninitialized in your example, so your code exhibits undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
My original intention is to get the address and type of particular member variable so that I can create another class to observe and update the variable (but not the whole class) – Yan Zhu Jun 24 '13 at 5:34
    
Well pointer-to-members sort of do that. You could store that pointer and a form of reference to the instance in a class. I don't really understand what you're trying to do, so hard to be more specific. – Mat Jun 24 '13 at 6:34
    
Thanks for you reply. I think I am good to go with your answer. I would like to boil down my question to the simplest one when I posted it on. But it also easily misleads people. – Yan Zhu Jun 24 '13 at 23:42

Short answer: No. But why would you want to? What's so special about that (class variable, member) notation? You can obviously write a function that takes st.t1 instead of st, t1 - why are you trying to avoid that?

Long answer: Not usefully. t1 is not in scope at the point you're calling FUNC(st, t1)... the current macro replaces it with st.t1 which can be found in the current scope. If you really really desparately wanted to hack something up, you'd have to put some kind of t1, t2, t3, h2 etc. objects in scope that could be passed to a function and somehow encoded which field should be accessed. Having the local t1 et al be pointers to the member variables is an obvious choice. That would be pretty inconvenient, verbose and error-prone though: setting up all those extra variables just to support this indirection.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry. My example may be oversimplified. My original intention is to get the address and type of particular member variable so that I can create another class to observe and update the variable (but not the whole class) – Yan Zhu Jun 24 '13 at 5:31
1  
Then the kind of technique Mat's illustrated should help you: internally it can store suitable functors, or create a suitable type-specific template instantiation that you can dispatch to polymorphically from within your observation/update code.... – Tony D Jun 24 '13 at 5:39
    
Thanks for your help. I only try to simplify my question but I didn't make my intention clear. – Yan Zhu Jun 24 '13 at 23:44

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