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Assume there are two objects of the following Account class - account1 and account2. And there are two threads T1 and T2.

T1 is transferring amount 100 from account1 to account2 as follows:

account1.transfer(account2, 100);

Similarly, T2 is transferring amount 50 from account2 to account1:

account2.transfer(account1, 50);

The transfer() method is obviously prone to deadlock as two threads T1 and T2 would be trying to acquire lock in the reverse order. (Thread T1 will try acquiring lock on account1 first and then account2. Whereas thread T2 will try acquiring lock on account2 and then on account1.)

What is the best way (in this case) to ensure locking-order to be guaranteed always?

public class Account {
    private float balance;

    public class Account() {
        balance = 5000f;
    }

    private void credit(float amt) {
        balance += amt;
    }

    // To exclude noise assume the balance will never be negative
    private void debit(float amt) {
        balance -= amt;
    }

    // Deadlock prone as the locking order is not guaranteed
    public void transfer(Account acc2, float amt) {
        synchronized(this) {
            synchronized(acc2) {
                acc2.debit(amt);
                this.credit(amt);
            }
        }
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

You can define a shared mutex to lock onto so that when any of the threads want to make a transaction, it tries to acquire that objact instead of accounts. If a thread locks onto this shared object, then you can make a transaction. When transaction is finished it can release the lock so that another thread may acquire that object again.

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That's a solution - thanks. But, if there are 4 accounts a1 thru a4 and 4 threads T1 thru T4. T1 & T2 working with a1 & a2. T3 & T4 working with a3 & a4. I want (T1 & T2 group) and (T3 & T4 group) to work simultaneously i.e. these two sets of operation need not wait for lock. –  Learner Jun 24 '13 at 7:36
    
@Learner, that is definitely not a problem, you just need to define a mutex object for every combination of account pairs. In the case of 4 accounts you can use 6 separate mutexes in a vector. –  RonaldoMessi Jun 24 '13 at 7:41
    
So the implementation gets fairly complex to generalize the permutation and combination of mutexes. Also, if there are 1 million accounts I could not imagine how many mutexes are required?! We may have lazy initialization of mutexes but then that will introduce new set of complexities. –  Learner Jun 24 '13 at 8:29
    
@Learner, then you can keep the mutexes as a member of accounts so that when an account wants to connect another one, it just tries to acquire it. total nummber of mutexes will be equal to the total number of accounts –  RonaldoMessi Jun 24 '13 at 9:03

I would give only one thread access to the 'accounts' data. Any other thread that wants to transfer funds has to queue a 'transferRequest' object to it that contains the account IDs, the amount to be transferred an exception/errorMessage field and a callback/event, with the transferRequest as a parameter, for the thread to call when it has attempted the transaction.

The transfers are then serialized in their entirety, the only lock is in the queue, so deadlock is not possible.

I hate multiple locks, correctly ordered or no.

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Thanks Martin for the response. Basically, you are proposing event based mechanism to achieve this - agree with you. But, my intension of posting this question is to know "how should order of locking be ensured?" –  Learner Jun 24 '13 at 7:42
    
Yeah - I was not sure if my reply should have been an answer or a comment, but decided on answer. I could argue that 'my solution ensures the order of locking by reducing the number of locks to one, irrespective of the number of accounts or threads. If there is no ordering, the ordering cannot be incorrect':) Part of efficient multithreading design is not solving problems, but making the problems go away completely so they don't have to be solved. This certainly applies to multiple locks. –  Martin James Jun 24 '13 at 8:32

You can implement ordering of the synchronized blocks yourself. Create a unique id for each account on creation and use synchronized in sorted order:

class Account {

  private float balance;
  private final int id;
  private static AtomicInteger idGen = new AtomicInteger(0);

  public Account() {
    id = idGen.incrementAndGet();
    balance = 5000f;
  }

  private void credit(float amt) {
    balance += amt;
  }

  // To exclude noise assume the balance will never be negative
  private void debit(float amt) {
    balance -= amt;
  }

  // Deadlock prone as the locking order is not guaranteed
  public void transfer(Account acc2, float amt) {
    Account first = this.id > acc2.id ? acc2 : this;
    Account second = this.id > acc2.id ? this : acc2;

    synchronized (first) {
      synchronized (second) {
        acc2.debit(amt);
        this.credit(amt);
      }
    }

  }
}

But this approach is usable only if you know all the accounts to lock in advance.


Edit: I will try to clarify the part about knowing all the locks in advance.

In a simple exemaple like this, it is easy to collect all the needed locks, sort them and then lock them in correct order. The problem starts when your code gets more and more complicated and you try to use abstraction to keep the code readable. The lock ordering concept kind of goes aginst abstraction. When you call some encapsulated unknown code (which migth try to acquire more locks or call other code), you can no longer ensure correct lock ordering.

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This looks like a good and simple solution - Thanks! However, I did not get why you say this approach is usable only if all accounts to lock is known in advance? Can you elaborate please? –  Learner Jun 24 '13 at 12:37

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