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select 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') >= 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:20:00 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') 
  and 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') <= 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:50:00 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') as a;

is true, but:

select 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') >=
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:20:00 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') 
  and 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') <= 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 12:50:00 PM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') as a

result is false

please solve it ..

share|improve this question
    
"please solve it". Please provide a detailed question that can be answered, according to the guidance provided in the new user help here: stackoverflow.com/help and the guidance on asking better PostgreSQL questions here: stackoverflow.com/tags/postgresql/info . What are you trying to accomplish? What result would you expect to happen? What did you already try? –  Craig Ringer Jun 24 '13 at 7:23

2 Answers 2

You need to use "am" or "pm" not "a" as the 12-hour specifier.

to_timestamp('2013-06-24 12:50:00 PM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss am')

Working this out is a simple process. You get an unexpected "false" from the second query. So you evaluate each branch separately to see which one is false:

regress=> select 
regress->   to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') >=
regress->   to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:20:00 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a');
 ?column? 
----------
 t
(1 row)

regress=> select   to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') <= 
regress->   to_timestamp('2013-06-24 12:50:00 PM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') as a;
 a 
---
 f
(1 row)

OK, so it's the second one that's unexpectedly not matching. The timestamps look like the condition should match, so let's look at the output of the to_timestamp function on each:

regress=> select to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a'), 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 12:50:00 PM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a');
      to_timestamp      |      to_timestamp      
------------------------+------------------------
 2013-06-24 11:36:40+08 | 2013-06-24 00:50:00+08
(1 row)

Huh, will you look at that. 12:50 has turned into 00:50. A 12-hour offset suggests that the PM isn't being recognised. Let's look at the documentation:

  • AM, am, PM or pm meridiem indicator (without periods)

Looks like you wanted am or pm, not just a as you wrote in the time pattern you used. Let's try it with the corrected indicator:

regress=> select to_timestamp('2013-06-24 12:50:00 PM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss am');
       to_timestamp      
------------------------
 2013-06-24 12:50:00+08
(1 row)

That did it. Feed it back into the original query and....

select 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss am') >=
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:20:00 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss am') 
  and 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss am') <= 
  to_timestamp('2013-06-24 12:50:00 PM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss am') as a

... returns true as expected. So there you go, that's step-by-step problem solving 101.

share|improve this answer
    
yea got it thank you Sir..have a nice day –  user2493093 Jun 24 '13 at 7:54
    
@user2493093 Glad to help. I hope you've also got some information that'll help you solve future problems - and come up with better questions when you can't. Please take a look at stackoverflow.com/help/someone-answers if this has helped. –  Craig Ringer Jun 24 '13 at 11:18

I have checked the below query posted by you and found that to_timestamp function returns below result to compare.

-----Below query returns 0 (i.e.False)-----

select to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') >= to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:20:00 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') and to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a') <= to_timestamp('2013-06-24 12:50:00 PM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a')as a


---Below are the conditions for comparison--
First Condition to compare(this returns True) to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a')-->June, 24 2013 10:36:40+0000 to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:20:00 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a')-->June, 24 2013 10:20:00+0000


---Second condition to compare(this returns false)--
to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a')-->June, 24 2013 10:36:40+0000 to_timestamp('2013-06-24 12:50:00 PM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh:mi:ss a')-->June, 23 2013 23:50:00+0000


As you have noticed that here the second condition compares June, 24 2013 with June, 23 2013 which returns false.

Try Below Query which returns True result
/---Below query returns 1 (i.e.True)----/

select to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh24:mi:ss a')
>= to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:20:00 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh24:mi:ss a') 
and to_timestamp('2013-06-24 11:36:40 AM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh24:mi:ss a')
<= to_timestamp('2013-06-24 12:50:00 PM', 'yyyy-MM-dd hh24:mi:ss a')as a

In above query I have used 24Hr format for comparison.(yyyy-MM-dd hh24:mi:ss)

I have test the result on http://sqlfiddle.com/

I hope this helps you.

Thanks Jignesh

share|improve this answer
    
The diagnostic process you used is good, but the conclusion is wrong. Using hh24 won't correctly handle, say, 2:20:00 pm. You really want the am meridiem indicator format placeholder. Upvoting despite that error - thankyou for participating and trying to help others out. –  Craig Ringer Jun 24 '13 at 7:40
    
Yea got it ..Thank you sir –  user2493093 Jun 24 '13 at 7:54

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