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Row No. Start Date  End Date
1   28/11/2012           28/11/2012
2   28/11/2012            6/12/2012
3   6/12/2012             6/12/2012
4   22/01/2013           23/01/2013
5   23/01/2013  

I have following two queries based on the above sample data:-

  1. SQL to bring records where there is no continuity in the dates (for eg. rrecord 3 ends on 6/12/2012, but the record 4 starts on 22/01/2013)

  2. Adjusting the dates where there is no continuity in dates (eg. updating the start date of records 4 to 6/12/12 to make the continuity)

Thanks in advance Harry

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2  
So what is the question ? –  X.L.Ant Jun 24 '13 at 6:59
    
So basically I think he wants the queries that check if the previous record's END DATE is equal to the next records START DATE. If not, return that record (request #1). Then update the START DATE to be equal with the previous END DATE (request #2). –  Radu Gheorghiu Jun 24 '13 at 7:50
    
@Radu Gheorghiu Spot on. That's what I am looking for. –  Harry Jun 24 '13 at 7:59
    
@Harry did you try to write the query yourself? –  Radu Gheorghiu Jun 24 '13 at 8:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the lag function to refer back to a value on the previous row (defining what 'previous' means as part of the query; I've assumed your 'row number' is a pseudocolumn, not an actual column you could order by, and you want them in start-date order):

select start_date, end_date,
  case
    when lag_end_date is null then start_date
    when lag_end_date = start_date then start_date
    else lag_end_date
  end as adj_start_date
from (
  select start_date, end_date,
    lag(end_date) over (order by start_date, end_date) as lag_end_date
  from <your_table>
)

(SQL Fiddle).

The first when clause of the case is dealing with the 'first' row, with the earliest start date; since there is no previous row the lag is going to be null.

You can then filter the results to get those where start_date and adj_start_date don't match. (Another SQL Fiddle).

You can use the same kind of construct in a merge to do the update:

merge into <your table>
using (
  select r_id, start_date, end_date,
    case when lag_end_date is null then null
      when lag_end_date = start_date then null
      else lag_end_date
    end as adj_start_date
  from (
    select rowid as r_id, start_date, end_date,
      lag(end_date) over (order by start_date, end_date) as lag_end_date
    from t42
  )
) t
on (your_table>.rowid = t.r_id and t.adj_start_date is not null)
when matched then
update set <your table>.start_date = t.adj_start_date;

(SQL Fiddle).

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Thanks Alex. Its really helpful and working for me. Cheers.... –  Harry Jun 25 '13 at 4:33

The SELECT statement is easy:

select * from your_table t1
where t1.end_date is not null
and not exists
   ( select null from your_table t2
     where t2.start_date = t1.end_date
     and t2.row_no != t1.row_no )

The qualification the sub-query prevents record 3 from satisfying itself. This may not be the complete solution. If you have multiple records with the same start and end dates then you might end up failing to identify some records. In this case the reliability of ROW_NO is important.

If you can guarantee that for any given pair of records the higher ROW_NO always indicates a chronologically later record then the fix is simple:

     where t2.start_date = t1.end_date
     and t2.row_no > t1.row_no )

There are some circumstances where this guarantee might not be possible; it depends how the ROW_NO is assigned. But there are already a number of presumptions here and I'm not going to address them unless you provide further details.

The UPDATE statement is trickier.

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Thanks APC for your response. I appreciate your time. –  Harry Jun 25 '13 at 11:09

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