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I'm currently trying to create an automated process to parse a selection of particularly big log files (25MB+) on the fly, and return them to the user via a Java Servlet.

Due to the size of these logs, I am trying to execute Linux parsing commands to retrieve the sections of relevance to the user, before loading them into memory. These sections could be spread over the whole log.

I'm still in the early stages of getting the hang of regex's and text parsing tools (such as sed), and I was hoping someone could point me the right direction towards my current problem.

I have a selection of logs that refer to a specific item on a line (eg. KEY1), followed by an unknown number of lines of information about this item.

The log will then switch to the next item and repeat

I am trying to work out if there is any combination of linux based text commands, that could take a file of the format

This is the first line and should not display
This is a section containing the text KEY1
Line 1
Line 2
Line 3
Line 4
This is a section containing the text KEY2
BadLine 1
BadLine 2
This is a second section containing the text KEY1
Line 5
Line 6
This is a section containing the text KEY3
BadLine 3
BadLine 4
BadLine 5
BadLine 6
This is a third section containing the text KEY1
Line 7
Line 8
Line 9
This is the last line

and return:

This is a section containing the text KEY1
Line 1
Line 2
Line 3
Line 4
This is a second section containing the text KEY1
Line 5
Line 6
This is a third section containing the text KEY1
Line 7
Line 8
Line 9
This is the last line

The command

sed -n '/KEY1/,/KEY2/p' file

Does the job of grabbing the first section, but I'm having trouble finding a generic way of extracting everything I need.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

-- Edit --

2013/06/20 03:10:01 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:128] 
foo
bar
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
2013/06/20 03:10:02 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:132] 
Other foo
Other bar
------------------------------------------
Other foo
Other bar
Other foo
Other bar
------------------------------------------
2013/06/20 03:10:03 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:128] 
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar

For clarification, this is the format I'm working with. I'm trying to get all the info for a specific device in the log. e.g. all text under the key [ID:128], but ignoring the section under [ID:132] (or any other id than ID:128 as there is no specific order the devices will be coming in under)

share|improve this question
    
Hey, can you give some reasonable examples on how KEY1, KEY2 and KEY3 could look like? –  Ju Liu Jun 24 '13 at 9:06
    
I've updated the post for clarification. Cheers. –  JamesA Jun 24 '13 at 9:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Code for GNU , after some edits:

sed -rn '/\[ID:[0-9]+\]/{/\[ID:128\]/!{s/.*\B(\[ID:[0-9]+\])\B.*/\1/;H}};${x;s/\n//;s/\]\n\[/\\]|\\[/g;s@(.*)]@/\\[ID:128\\]/,/\\\1\\]/\{/\\\1\\]/!p\}@p}' file|sed -nrf - file

$cat file
2013/06/20 03:10:01 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:128]
foo
bar
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
2013/06/20 03:10:02 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:132]
Other foo
Other bar
------------------------------------------
Other foo
Other bar
Other foo
Other bar
------------------------------------------
2013/06/20 03:10:03 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:128]
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
2013/06/20 03:10:02 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:32]
Other foo
Other bar
------------------------------------------
Other foo
Other bar
Other foo
Other bar
------------------------------------------
2013/06/20 03:10:03 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:128]
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
2013/06/20 03:10:02 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:132]
Other foo
Other bar
------------------------------------------
Other foo
Other bar
Other foo
Other bar
------------------------------------------
2013/06/20 03:10:03 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:17]
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar

$sed -rn "/\[ID:[0-9]+\]/{/\[ID:128\]/!{s/.*\B(\[ID:[0-9]+\])\B.*/\1/;H}};${x;s/\n//;s/\]\n\[/\\]|\\[/g;s@(.*)]@/\\[ID:128\\]/,/\\\1\\]/\{/\\\1\\]/!p\}@p}" file|sed -nrf - file
2013/06/20 03:10:01 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:128]
foo
bar
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
2013/06/20 03:10:03 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:128]
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
2013/06/20 03:10:03 PM| FINE |S9180 |[Device] [ID:128]
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar
foo
bar
------------------------------------------
foo
bar

The first sed call "collects" all keys with the Regex pattern /\[ID:[0-9]+\]/ except [ID:128]. The second call filters the unwanted sections with the collected keys.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this certainly helps, but I'll need to do this over a 25MB+ log file where the keys could be coming in in a random order. I need something more generic to grab out the chunks. e.g between [ID:128] and [ID:SomeOtherNumberThan128]. Is this possible using sed? (or any other linux text parsing tool)? –  JamesA Jun 24 '13 at 10:18
    
@JamesA made an edit, you can test the new sed code. –  captcha Jun 24 '13 at 12:59
    
That did the trick. Perfect. Cheers. –  JamesA Jun 24 '13 at 13:14
    
The code may fail with @ in the text, this maybe fixed if needed. –  captcha Jun 24 '13 at 13:18

I think a more general approach would be:

perl -ne 'print if /KEY1/../KEY(?!1)/' input.txt | perl -ne 'print unless /KEY(?!1)/'

and

perl -ne 'print if /ID:128/../ID:(?!128)/' file.txt | perl -ne 'print unless /ID:(?!128)/'

There are some important concepts here:

  • KEY(?!1) means "KEY not followed by 1"
  • "perl -ne" means "disable printing by default"
  • so, printing is enabled only when the text matches the pattern "line with KEY1, any number of lines, line with KEY not followed by 1"
  • the second perl call removes the lines with KEY2 and KEY3 who would be printed otherwise

I guess there is a better way to remove the KEY2 and KEY3 lines, but I couldn't figure out how to do that: some perl masters could help you more!

share|improve this answer
    
Appreciate it, but I don't have access to perl on the web server I'll be installing this on, so I'm hoping for a solution that uses awk or sed. –  JamesA Jun 24 '13 at 11:42

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