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Python's Formatter class "allows you to create and customize your own string formatting behaviors using the same implementation as the built-in format() method". Since one can do

>>> '{}'.format(3.14)
'3.14'

and

>>> format(3.14, '')
'3.14'

I was expecting the following to work too:

>>> string.Formatter().format('{}', 3.14)
(…)
KeyError: ''

Is there any standard way of handling this very usual and simple formatting string with a Formatter? or must the Formatter be customized before behaving more like Python's format()? is this really doable in a robust way (thread-safe,…)?

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My guess would be that formatters are not required to understand {} because that was not valid in Python 2.6 and 3.0 ({0} was required instead). –  Janne Karila Jun 24 '13 at 9:56
3  
The question Should string.Format also support auto-numbering? is discussed in bugs.python.org/issue5237#msg83559 –  Janne Karila Jun 24 '13 at 10:03
    
The thread you cite is interesting. It looks like not much has changed on this front since it was started in 2009… If this is confirmed, I would accept this as the response to the question. :) –  EOL Jun 24 '13 at 11:01
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The original implementation of new-style string formatting in Python 2.6/3.0 did not allow empty {} templates. The change that allows them is documented as issue 5237: Allow auto-numbered replacement fields in str.format() strings. On that page, message 83559 from Eric V. Smith ponders the question whether string.Format also should support auto-numbering (I suppose he means string.Formatter) and concludes against it.

A patch has been proposed in issue 13598: string.Formatter doesn't support empty curly braces "{}".

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The discussion dates back to 2009: you are implying that the conclusions from that time are the latest available ones and are still in effect, right? –  EOL Jun 24 '13 at 11:45
1  
@EOL Found an open issue, updated answer. –  Janne Karila Jun 24 '13 at 12:41
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