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I have no idea why this code should work, but tell me what to do if i want to add two objects together. please. while you are trying to answer please be more noob specific

sorry for my bad english, I am an Indian, here is my code.

#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

class time
{
private:
    int sec;
    int mint;
    int hours;
public:
    int Inputsec;
    int Inputmint;
    int Inputhours;
time(int Inputsec, int Inputmint, int Inputhours):sec(Inputsec), mint(Inputmint), hours(Inputhours){};
time operator+(time Inputobj)
{
    time blah (sec+Inputsec,mint+Inputmint,hours+Inputhours);
    return blah;
}

void DisplayCurrentTime()
{
    cout << "The Current Time Is"<<endl<< hours<<" hours"<<endl<<mint<<"minutes"<<endl<<sec<<"seconds"<<endl;
}
};

int main()
{
time now(11,13,3);
time after(13,31,11);
time then(now+after);
then.DisplayCurrentTime();
}

code is working fine but it is giving me horrible output. Where is my mistake?

share|improve this question
    
Being Indian is no excuse for an incomplete topic - copy/paste that 'horrible output' and we might actually understand some of it. –  Niels Keurentjes Jun 24 '13 at 11:59
    
" horrible output"? How about telling us the actual and expected output? –  John Zwinck Jun 24 '13 at 12:00
    
Also note: time already exists in ctime header. –  soon Jun 24 '13 at 12:05
    
'I am an Indian',how does that relate to being bad in English? –  rohit srivastava Jun 24 '13 at 12:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your addition operator is using unitinitialized member Inputsec, Inputmint and Inputhours variables. It should look like this:

time operator+(time Inputobj)
{
    return time(sec+InputObj.sec, mint+InputObj.mint, hours+InputObj.hours);
}

or

time operator+(time Inputobj)
{
    InputObj.sec += sec;
    InputObj.mint += mint;
    InputObj.hours += hours;
    return InputObj;
}

Or, even better, implement time& operator+=(const time& rhs); and use it in a non-member addition operator:

time operator+(time lhs, const time& rhs)
{
  return lhs += rhs;
}

You have two sets of member variables representing the same thing. You do not need this duplication.

One final remark: there is something called std::time in header<ctime>. Having a class called time, and using namespace std is asking for trouble. You should avoid both if possible (avoiding the second is definitely possible).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you juan, that expalins everything :) –  Noob.Alone.Programmer Jun 24 '13 at 12:21

You should rewrite your operator+ at least as follows:

time operator+(time Inputobj)
{
    time blah time(sec+InputObj.sec, mint+InputObj.mint, hours+InputObj.hours);
    return blah;
}

also I think you should use the % operator for getting the correct time results:

time operator+(time Inputobj){
    int s = (sec+InputObj.sec) % 60;
    int m = (sec+InputObj.sec) / 60 + (mint+InputObj.mint) % 60;
    int h = (mint+InputObj.mint) / 60 + (hours+InputObj.hours) % 24;
    return time(s,m,h);
}
share|improve this answer

Your operator overloading function is using uninitialized variables. Initialize variables inputsec, inputmint, Inputhours in your constructor.

Moreover, try this:

time operator+ (time Inputobj)
{
   time blah (sec+Inputobj.sec, mint+Inputobj.mint, hours+Inputobj.hours);
   return blah;
}
share|improve this answer

Your error is your publics members with the same name as the parameter constructor, which are unitialized. Try this :

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class time
{
private:
    int sec;
    int mint;
    int hours;
public:
time(int Inputsec, int Inputmint, int Inputhours):sec(Inputsec), mint(Inputmint), hours(Inputhours)
{
};

time operator+(time Inputobj)
{
    time blah (sec+Inputobj.sec, mint+Inputobj.mint, hours+Inputobj.hours);
    return blah;
}

void DisplayCurrentTime()
{
    cout << "The Current Time Is"<<endl<< hours<<" hours"<<endl<<mint<<"minutes"<<endl<<sec<<"seconds"<<endl;
}
};

int main()
{
time now(11,13,3);
time after(13,31,11);
time then(now+after);
then.DisplayCurrentTime();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Setters/Getters should not be created just for the sake of it, especially for something like an overloaded + operator, as a class has access to private members of it's own type when they are used as input parameters, so you can directly call Inputobj.sec within the + operator function. –  Muckle_ewe Jun 24 '13 at 12:12

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