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How can I fetch all the dependencies of Go packages at once using version tags on specific imports ?

Say I have my go tree with multiple packages in it :

src/
    foo/
        bar/               (go code in package bar)
            x.go
        quux/              (go code in package main)
            y.go

Now let the package `bar' depends on a third party library that use tag versions
(i.e. usually fetched with : go get -tags mylib_2.0 github.com/user/mylib)

What I want to do is to specify a tag on the import line so that go get ./... on my tree gets the correct version scheme. Something like:

import "github.com/user/mylib" `tags=mylib_2.0`
share|improve this question
    
Re: "I want to do is to specify a tag on the import line so that go get ./... on my tree gets the correct version scheme." That's not generally possible. And it's not specific to Go. –  zzzz Jun 24 '13 at 12:11
    
So how am I suppose to handle that case ? (say it's an automated build system) Is there any workaround ? –  3XX0 Jun 24 '13 at 12:23
    
If it's not possible in the general case then there's no way to handle it in the general case. Consider a1->b1->d1 and a1->c1->d2. Which version of d should go get checkout? You cannot have two (or more) different versions of a repo checked out at the same time in the same location. But the location depends solely on the import path, not on any version. –  zzzz Jun 24 '13 at 12:26
    
Well go get could issue an error in that case. The same problematic arises if you do : go get -tags mylib_2.0 github.com/user/mylib and use mylib 3.0 calls somewhere else no ? –  3XX0 Jun 24 '13 at 12:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

change you project structure too:

src/
    foo/
        bar/
           v1/    (go code in package bar)
              x.go
           v2/
              x.go
        quux/ 
             v1/   (go code in package main)
                y.go

this is the only possible way to handle different version of your libs.

with this you also solve the problem jnml described, now each lib would have its own dependencies and versions to other libs.

update due to comments:

according to workspace documentation described here:
http://golang.org/doc/code.html#Workspaces

your structure will looke like

src/
    foo/
        bar/
           v1/    (go code in package bar)
              x.go
           v2/
              x.go
        quux/ 
             v1/   (go code in package main)
                y.go
        meier/ 
             v1/   (go code in package main)
                w.go
             v2/   (go code in package main)
                w.go

now in your bar lib (x.go) you need functions from lib *quux (y.go)
to import this you will write :

import "foo/quux/v1/"

just as note you can also do the version before package in your structure so instead of foo/quux/v1 your structure could look like /foo/v1/quux, then you dont need to name the imports.

now lib quux uses lib meier in version 1
so import will be:

import "foo/meier/v1"

and regarding to jnml, now you lib bar also needs lib meier but in version 2
so import will look like:

import "foo/meier/v2"

now when you call: bar -> quux -> meier
you will see that you can't assign /pass the return value in bar to something from meier

because: meier/v1 != meier/v2

and this will fail already during compilation.

if you need to work with result from quux which is coming from meier v1 you need to also import meier/v1 in bar

share|improve this answer
    
It solves only/at most the location part. It doesn't solve assign incompatible types v1.T and v2.T (transitively available in the same package), init functions being run twice, global variables doubling, etc. –  zzzz Jun 24 '13 at 12:53
    
yes, but transitively usage of an lib/api is something you shouldn't do at all, and the other yeah they are twice but thats what he want –  fmt.Println.MKO Jun 24 '13 at 12:57
    
Consider a1->b1->d1 and a1->c1->d2. Now: package a; import ("b"; "c"); func main() { x, y := b.F(), c.F()} // x not assignable to y. package b; import "d"; func F() d.T { return d.T{} }, package c; import "d"; func G() d.T { return d.T{} }. Transitive type use is not avoidable in non trivial programs. –  zzzz Jun 24 '13 at 13:10
    
I didn't get how the project structure would change this problem could you elaborate a little more ? If I have two packages that depend on different library versions (bar->mylib1 and quux->mylib2) how v1 and v2 handle that ? Are you assuming that dependencies are the same across package versions (bar(v1)->mylib1 / quux(v1)->mylib1 and bar(v2)->mylib2) ? –  3XX0 Jun 24 '13 at 13:56
    
I extended the answer,hope its more clear what I mean, as example this is the way google also uses, here is an example: code.google.com/p/google-api-go-client/source/browse/… –  fmt.Println.MKO Jun 24 '13 at 14:23

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