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I am new to php oop , so struggling a bit .

i have a database connection class viz :

  class config{

   protected $HOST = "localhost";
   protected $USERNAME = "something" ;
   protected $PASSWORD = "something";
   protected $DATABASE = "something";

// Constructor - open DB connection
function __construct() {

try {
    $this->db = new mysqli($this->HOST, $this->USERNAME, $this->PASSWORD, $this-
    >DATABASE);
    $this->db->autocommit(FALSE);
    }
catch(Exception $e)
    {   
    if($this->db->connect_errno > 0){

    echo 'Caught exception: ',  $e->getMessage(), "\n";
    }
    }

    }

   // Destructor - close DB connection
     function __destruct() {
    $this->db->close();
    }


 }

 $api = new Config();

Now i have another class from which i need to perform some tasks ...but i get FATAL error .

second class :

  class Myclass extends config {

   function __construct(){}

   public function myfunction()
   {
    try{


     $stmt = $this->db->stmt_init();   /* Error here : Fatal error: Call to a member                 
                                          function stmt_init() on a non-object */
 $query = "SELECT ABC FROM table " ;

 $stmt = $this->db->prepare($query); /* Error here : Fatal error: Call to a member                 
                                          function prepare() on a non-object   */
      }
     catch(){}

   }

   }

Please guide me with proper remedial code snippet

share|improve this question
    
The proper remedy is not more code, it's learning how to debug what you already have. –  Jon Jun 24 '13 at 12:27
    
whats the fata error you get? –  DevZer0 Jun 24 '13 at 12:27
    
i have commented that in my code ..please have a look at the second class code snippet –  Nikhil Jun 24 '13 at 12:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In your child class, you need to call the parent constructor. PHP won't automatically call parent constructor's when a child class is instantiated.

 class Myclass extends config {

     function __construct($h, $u, $p, $d){ parent::__construct($h, $u, $p, $d); }

Also, you don't have a $db property in the parent class, so add that

 class config{

   protected $db;
   protected $HOST = "localhost";
   protected $USERNAME = "something" ;
   protected $PASSWORD = "something";
   protected $DATABASE = "something";

Edit: Dependency Injection approach:

class config{
   public $HOST = "localhost";
   public $USERNAME = "something" ;
   public $PASSWORD = "something";
   public $DATABASE = "something";
}

class Myclass
{
   protected $db;

   function __construct($db)
   {
      $this->db = $db;
   }

   public function myfunction()
   {
       // do whatever with $this->db
   }
}

$config = new Config();

try
{
    $db = new mysqli($config->HOST, $config->USERNAME, $config->PASSWORD, $config->DATABASE);
    $db->autocommit(FALSE);
}
catch(Exception $e)
{   
    if($db->connect_errno > 0){
        echo 'Caught exception: ',  $e->getMessage(), "\n";
    }
}

$myclass = new Myclass($db);

Have a look into Dependency Injection. This is a favorable approach for dealing with classes that need access to a database. Instead of having all your classes extend the database, just pass the datsbase object as a parameter when creating new classes (that need the db).

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks ! this worked ... would like to know a little bit more If instead of extending the class i make use of require_once('Config.php') ; then what changes do i have to make .... because this way i cant access parent constructor .... –  Nikhil Jun 24 '13 at 12:34
    
Without extending you could create the $db outside of both classes, and when you create new objects based on the classes, pass the $db to the constructors and let the class store it as a property, so the classes can still use $this->db throughout. –  MrCode Jun 24 '13 at 12:40
    
it would be really great if you could explain me this with some small example –  Nikhil Jun 24 '13 at 12:42
    
Added an example of basic Dependency Injection –  MrCode Jun 24 '13 at 12:54
    
Hey thanks @MrCode !!! –  Nikhil Jun 24 '13 at 12:56

Your derived class constructor is not calling the base constructor, so $this->db does not have the value it's supposed to. In PHP you must do this explicitly.

In this particular case, you should remove the derived constructor altogether since it's not doing anything. This will let PHP use the base constructor directly.

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