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I want to display the real time in a label and I found two approaches to update NSDate:

The performSelector approach:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    [self updateTime];
}

- (void)updateTime
{
    NSDateFormatter *dateFormat = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
    [dateFormat setDateFormat:@"hh:mm:ss"];
    label.text = [dateFormat stringFromDate:[NSDate date]];

    //call updateTime again after 1 second
    [self performSelector:@selector(updateTime) withObject:self afterDelay:1.0];
}

The NSTimer approach:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    Timer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:1.0 target:self selector:@selector(updateTime) userInfo:nil repeats:YES];
}    

- (void)updateTime 
{
    NSDateFormatter *dateFormat = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
    [dateFormat setDateFormat:@"hh:mm:ss"];
    label.text = [dateFormat stringFromDate:[NSDate date]];
}

Which one is the better, more performant and reliable method?

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It is expensive to create a NSDateFormatter. Create it once and reuse it. –  Tom Redman Feb 19 at 15:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Firstly, this is not quite related to Xcode.

Secondly: more performant? Seriously? When it's called one time a second? Just forget worrying about efficiency.

Thirdly, they're equivalent, but I don't see the need for the recursion-like self-invocation of the method. Just go with NSTimer, it's exactly why it was invented.

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There's no recursion in either of these cases. performSelector:withObject:afterDelay: is just scheduling a future invocation of itself which is managed by the run loop; There's no danger of blowing up the stack. –  ipmcc Jun 24 '13 at 13:32
    
@ipmcc I didn't write it was going to blow up the stack, did I. (But you are right that technically there's no recursion.) My main problem with that is readability and the abuse of the tool. –  user529758 Jun 24 '13 at 13:32
    
Thanks for your quick answers H2CO3 and ipmcc. I will go with NSTimer. –  codediggah Jun 24 '13 at 13:37

A timer does its best to perform on a "fixed" schedule, ie every second.

On the other hand, calling performSelector:afterDelay at the end of a function that took, say, 500ms to execute, will result in your function being called every 1500ms (the 500ms it took to execute + the 1s delay).

Thus the timer is more reliable. As H2CO3 said, forget about performance, it's a non-problem with such simple tasks.

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Thx for your explanation. I noticed if I use scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:0.5 the seconds still run correct (every second). Why is that? –  codediggah Jun 24 '13 at 13:48
    
You're updating twice in a second. It's just you can't see it, because the text remains the same during two consecutive runs. –  Cyrille Jun 24 '13 at 13:59
    
OK now I got it, thx again. –  codediggah Jun 24 '13 at 14:00

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