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I couldn't really find an answer to this question on google, so here goes.

Is it okay to use a Static object so the rest of the program can reference the object? I don't exactly know how to clarify my question, so I'll just show example code.

public class Client {

    Frame f;
    private static Client mainClient;

    public static void main(String[] args){
        new Client().init();
    }

    private void init(){

        mainClient = this;
        f = new Frame();

    }

    public static Client getClient() {
        return mainClient;
    }

    public Frame getFrame(){
        return f;
    }   
}

So, is it acceptable to use the getClient() method throughout the program to get access to the Frame object, as opposed to sending it as a parameter to (most) of the objects I create? Frame is used throughout the program, and adding it as a parameter just adds one parameter to each constructor.

Thanks

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1  
It's important to note that there's really no such thing as a "static instance". There are static variables, but an object isn't inherently static or not. –  Jon Skeet Jun 24 '13 at 14:29
1  
@Jtvd78 The short answer is: this is absolutely acceptable. Just watch out for thread-safety, if you're using threads. –  emesx Jun 24 '13 at 14:30
1  
It would be worthwhile to ask: 1) whether there will always be exactly one Frame during the lifetime of this application, 2) whether all parts of the program really need to access the whole Frame, and 3) whether a data model should be shared rather than a Frame. –  Andy Thomas Jun 24 '13 at 14:34
    
To clarify, there is only one instance of the Client, which makes only one instance of the Frame. And that is throughout the whole program. As for thread saftey, can someone clarify why this is not thread-safe? Also, you mentioned that it may be a better alternative to share the data model. And I will look into that as an option –  Jtvd78 Jun 24 '13 at 14:46

8 Answers 8

Depends on more than one thing...

1) Usage. Do you want to be able to say MyClass.getClient() and get a reference to the Client variable? If you're aiming at a singleton sort of thing - yes. If you're aiming at a very convenient thing - yes if safe, if you just want it visible everywhere - no. If accessing it from wrong place/time causes crashes and bugs - no.

2) People People will use whatever you expose, period. If they see your code fetching Client like that, they will use it when inappropriate as well, so will it cause many bugs? :)

3) Design Do you really need it? Is it cleaner to pass it around like an argument than having absolute access to it at any time?

After gauging those, you decide. This looks like it builds and works fine. But anything that needs this sort of unrestricted access (anytime access mentioned above) to runtime-specifics might not be the best approach; what works for homework might not for enterprise software.

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2  
+1: what works for homework might not for enterprise software this is pure gold. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jun 24 '13 at 14:37

To understand if in your case is ok to use the Singleton pattern you should ask "Does that component remain the same during the lifetime of the application?", if yes then probably it would be better to isolate it in a class on its own.

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What you are describing is called the singleton pattern. Although there are some critics it is an often used pattern.

A second alternative to giving your object to every constructor would be a dependency injection framework. For Java one of the best choices would be Spring.

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1  
As an alternative to Spring I would recommend guice –  mariosangiorgio Jun 24 '13 at 14:29
    
@mariosangiorgio as an alternative to both Spring and Guice in a Java EE 5+ environment I would recommend using EJB 3 and/or CDI. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jun 24 '13 at 14:32

It is ok to do that. It would be helpful for you to read about singleton pattern

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2  
"OK" is overstating a bit. Singleton is rather widely considered an anti-pattern these days, in most cases. Mostly cause people tend not to know where it should and shouldn't be used, and end up turning everything into singletons. :P –  cHao Jun 24 '13 at 14:29

You're basically asking if it's okay to use a singleton pattern. Sure it is. But the problem is you have to make sure that you don't do GUI things in non-GUI threads. By allowing access to the Frame class you open that up for possible abuse. I assume you are the only programmer so just be careful with how you handle it.

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You just created a variation of SingleTon Pattern. Static object is used when you need only one instance of that object throughout your project.

The basic structure of a singleton is

public class Client {
    private static Client mainClient;


    private void Client (){
         // do initial tasks
    }

    public static Client getClient() {
        if(mainClient == null)
            mainClient = new Client();
        return mainClient;
    }

    public Frame getFrame(){
        return f;
    }   
}

SO you can get the frame using

Client.getClient().getFrame();
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Unsure if he wants exactly one instance, or ease of access, that's the thing.... :) –  Shark Jun 24 '13 at 14:34

Well, this implementation of singleton pattern is the one I hate the most. Okay, it's really easy to code it, but later on, if something has to be changed, you would have to change it in million of places. For singleton pattern I would use Dependency Injection - Inversion of Control pattern with a Singleton factory pattern and leave static variables exclusively for constants (e.g. Strings, Integers...).

Regarding your question, everything is acceptable. Implementation depends on your project requirements.

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"everything is acceptable"??? –  André Stannek Jun 24 '13 at 14:31
1  
@André: Yes, every structure and concept has some use in some context. If it didn't, it wouldn't exist. The big problem is knowing what context a particular concept is useful in. –  cHao Jun 24 '13 at 14:33
    
@André what works for enterprise software might not for homework, and vice-versa. –  Shark Jun 24 '13 at 14:35
    
Having some use doesn't mean it is acceptable. I agree that it depends on the context but there are also a lot of things you can do in programming that I would never consider acceptable. –  André Stannek Jun 24 '13 at 14:35
    
@Andre: that's the right word right there - you. In some cases, the course teacher / TA, in some other cases - clueless client that bought your department's code which was produced under strict guidelines and supervision of a manager that never touched code... Everything is acceptible, given the right circumstances and context :D –  Shark Jun 24 '13 at 14:43

Using static instance is perfectly okay for constants/immutable objects.

As for mutable objects, it depends. In simple programs with one thread, it works well. However, if it's multi-threaded or clustered, you should use singleton with caution or not at all.

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