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I'm guessing this has been asked many times I just have difficulty understanding other people's designs.

I am learning database design and having just read Database Design for Mere Mortals and am now onto another book - Paul Dubois on MySQL I'm having difficulty understanding how to deal with normalized data within mysql.

In our original Access database (badly designed!) we had a list of projects. These included various fields e.g. Site_ID (PK), Project Code, Project title, Project Manager, Borough, National Grid Reference etc.

Fields like Borough and National Grid reference could have multiple values. e.g. the project could reside in multiple boroughs and could have multiple National Grid References and these were listed in each field separated by commas.

e.g. Borough: Newham, Hackney NGR: TQ 3692 8506, TQ 3768 8600, TQ 3756 8332, TQ 3880 8468

Easy to list but difficult to search. So I've taken these to be multivalued fields and taken them out of the projects list table and put them into their own table called Borough_County and National_grid_Reference tables.

I have two questions regarding this

The first concerns key's and the second how I display the data back to the user.

In the mere mortals book it seems to indicate that you take the primary key from the 1st table (projects) and put it in your normalized table (Borough/county and NGR). It uses the same key. It also uses the same key as a foreign key.

Projects Table Site_ID (PK)
Project Code
Project title
etc..

Borough_County table
Site_ID (Primary and foreign key both from Projects)
Borough or County

National Grid Ref table
Site_ID (Primary and foreign key both from Projects)
NGR_SQ
NGR_Easting
NGR_Northing

This doesn't make sense to me as it has a 1:n relationship. Should they have their own primary key?

The second question is how do you display the normalised tables back to the users?

I understand that you put the normalised tables and original projects table back to together again in a 'view'.

I would like to use a View as a means of entering data from various normalised table. As we are used to writing e.g. TQ 3692 8506, TQ 3768 8600, etc. in NGR how would you get the database to separate out the values into their correct fields? If you put a space between TQ and 3692 does it know it’s a new field? and If you put a comma between does it know (can you tell it) that it is a new record in the normalized table?

Or am I seeing this in completely the wrong way as I am used to an Excel way of doing things?

thank you for any help.

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1 Answer 1

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This doesn't make sense to me as it has a 1:n relationship. Should they have their own primary key? Yes, but furthermore they need to have an associative table to resolve the many-to-many relationship.

Projects Table 
Site_ID (PK)
Project Code
Project title
etc..

Borough_County table
BC_ID
Borough or County

National Grid Ref table
NGR_ID
NGR_SQ
NGR_Easting
NGR_Northing

Projects_Borough_county
BC_ID
Site_ID

Projects_National_Grid
NGR_ID
Site_ID

The second question is how do you display the normalized tables back to the users? In access this would be done with subforms Depending on the User Interface and the mySQL back-end being used, this would be done based on queries joining the two tables together filtering on Site_ID

So if a user selects Site_ID 1 then your query to get the Borough_County for that site would be...

SELECT BC_ID, `Borough or county` 
FROM borough_County BC
INNER JOIN projects_Borough_county PBC on PBC.BC_ID=BC.BC_ID 
WHERE PBC.Site_ID = 1

I understand that you put the normalised tables and original projects table back to together again in a 'view'. You can but you don't have to.

*I would like to use a View as a means of entering data from various normalized table. As we are used to writing e.g. TQ 3692 8506, TQ 3768 8600, etc. in NGR how would you get the database to separate out the values into their correct fields? * The database doesn't your User Interface (UI) has to. now updating though a view may not work. Depending on the RDMBS/ UI, and a few other factors; but it's generally not the best design. (Record Locking can become a problem as do updates to multiple tables)

*If you put a space between TQ and 3692 does it know it’s a new field? * No

** and If you put a comma between does it know (can you tell it) that it is a new record in the normalized. again No.

This is why I asked about what UI you're using.

What you have here are 3 main tables. Projects, Borough_County, and National Grid Ref. Each one of these tables has their own Create, Review, Update, Delete (Crud) actions. Now within Projects table you would likely link the projects to (one or many) Borough County, or national Grid References. At the time that you do this, you may allow a user to ADD a new non-existing entry to National Grids/Borough County. The UI when designed efficiently could allow a user to enter a comma separated list or handle spaces but then it has to parse the data into the correct structures. UI/not database. when doing this you add an entry to the main table AND add an entry to the associative tables (Prefaced with Projects_ in my structure above)

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That is helpful, thank you. I hadn't realised that there was a many to many relationship between them Thinking this through.. One project can reside in several boroughs, One Borough can have many projects associated with it, Therefore the relationship is many to many. No UI as yet. I would like to see how it interacts with Access and Excel via ODBC. But realistically I guess I have to learn PHP and design an GUI some possibles to help: PHPrunner, Xataface and FileMaker. –  user2440524 Jun 24 '13 at 15:52
    
I'm not a big fan of MS Access for enterprise applications but it does have some quick turn around time for development when you have a small user base and need a proof of concept / visibility.. You could continue to use it; but when you get more than 5-10 active users in the system, you really need to be looking at something else. Now if the back end is more of an enterprise database, you may be able to extend that some. So as a prototype UI to test out your data model, it's not a bad choice; but it will likely be throw-away long term; so don't invest too much time/energy. –  xQbert Jun 24 '13 at 16:46
    
Any recommendations for developing the UI ? –  user2440524 Jun 25 '13 at 7:32
    
I'm not much of a UI expert. Depends on scope I would suppose. If you intend to have this on an intranet, internet, or just on a network file share. Whatever choice you have I would suggest mocking things up quickly and running it by users as a prototype (non-functioning) just so they can see workflow. –  xQbert Jun 25 '13 at 14:10

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