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I've read a about @selector but I couldn't find an answer to my question

I'm trying to pass parameters to @selector. this is a simple code about what I did :

- (void)viewDidLoad{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    NewsCell *cell = (NewsCell *)[tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:simpleTableIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil){
        NSArray *nib = [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"NewsCell" owner:self options:nil];
        cell = [nib objectAtIndex:0];
    }
    NSString *string = @"image.png";

    [self performSelectorInBackground:@selector(doSomeThing::) withObject:nil];
}

-(void) doSomeThing:(UITableViewCell *)newsCell imageName:(NSString *)imageName{
    NSLog(@"newsCell: %@", newsCell);
    NSLog(@"imageName: %@", imageName);
}

I've created new UITableViewCell called cell, it loads from another nib file called NewsCell

and created new string called string

The question is how to send cell and string as parameters to @selector in performSelectorInBackground, Any ideas ??

Thanks ..

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You have the doSomeThing:imageName set up correctly but you need to change the way you call the function with [doSomeThing:cell imageName:string] inside a dispatch_async function. –  Dummy Code Jun 24 '13 at 15:14
1  
By the way, I know you were probably trying to simply your example by doing this stuff in viewDidLoad, but you really shouldn't be creating/updating cells there. This dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier stuff should probably be performed in your UITableViewDataSource method tableView:cellForRowAtIndexPath, not in viewDidLoad. See the Table View Programming Guide for iOS. –  Rob Jun 24 '13 at 15:38
1  
@Rob that's right.. this code is just for example.. thanks –  Mujtaba Fathel Jun 24 '13 at 15:47
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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can pass only one parameter using performSelectorInBackground (using the withObject parameter).

If you want to doSomeThing in the background with two parameters, you can:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
    [self doSomeThing:cell imageName:string];
});

By the way, if doSomeThing is going to eventually do a UI update, make sure to dispatch that back to the main queue:

-(void) doSomeThing:(UITableViewCell *)newsCell imageName:(NSString *)imageName {

    // do your slow stuff in the background here

    NSLog(@"newsCell: %@", newsCell);
    NSLog(@"imageName: %@", imageName);

    // now update your UI

    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        // update your UI here
    });
}

And as a final caveat, if you're updating a cell asynchronously, if you want to be really careful, you may want to be sensitive to the fact that the cell may have scrolled off the screen by the time the asynchronous method completes (and worse, that the UITableView may have reused that cell for another row of the table). Thus, you might want to check to make sure the cell is still on screen. Thus, pass the indexPath parameter rather than the cell, and then use the UITableView method, cellForRowAtIndexPath, not to be confused with the very similarly named UITableViewDataSource method tableView:cellForRowAtIndexPath, to see if it's still visible:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
    [self doSomeThing:indexPath imageName:string];
});

And then

-(void) doSomeThing:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath imageName:(NSString *)imageName {

    // do your slow stuff in the background here

    NSLog(@"newsCell: %@", newsCell);
    NSLog(@"imageName: %@", imageName);

    // now update your UI

    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        UITableViewCell *newsCell = [self.tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:indexPath];
        if (newsCell)
        {
            // the cell is still visible, so update your UI here
        }
    });
}
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1  
Super, I never thought of this ;) –  Anoop Vaidya Jun 24 '13 at 15:14
3  
definitely the best solution, great answer –  Gabriele Petronella Jun 24 '13 at 15:16
2  
performSelectorInBackground looks pale compared to this –  Khanh Nguyen Jun 24 '13 at 15:17
1  
that's really a great solution, thanks a lot –  Mujtaba Fathel Jun 24 '13 at 15:26
    
it should be (dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0) is that right ?? i think you have forgot ", 0" –  Mujtaba Fathel Jun 24 '13 at 15:42
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You can pass an NSDictionary* or an NSArray* to performSelectorInBackground:

-(void)viewDidLoad {
    // Blah blah 
    NSDictionary* params = @{@"cell": cell, @"image": string};
    [self performSelectorInBackground:@selector(doSomething:) withObject:params];
}

-(void)doSomething:(NSDictionary*)params {
    UITableViewCell* cell = params[@"cell"];
    NSString* image = params[@"image"];

    // Blah blah...
}

I personally prefer NSDictionary to NSArray as it looks clearer.

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+1 Good answer. Either this or @Rob's is the best solution. –  Dummy Code Jun 24 '13 at 15:17
    
Exactly what I meant :) –  Anoop Vaidya Jun 24 '13 at 15:18
    
This is fine if you don't mind changing -doSomething:imageName: such that it only takes one parameter, or providing another method that converts the dictionary into a call to -doSomething:imageName:. I don't think it's a "best" solution, though, because it avoids the problem that the OP asks about rather than solving it. –  Caleb Jun 24 '13 at 15:23
    
Hm that's a limitation of performSelectorInBackground I guess. It would be nice if they added a version like performSelectorInBackground:withObject1:object2: so on. But they didn't... Anyway doSomething is a method the OP owns, so there should be no trouble changing it. –  Khanh Nguyen Jun 24 '13 at 15:25
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The question is how to send 'cell' and 'string' as parameters to @selector in performSelectorInBackground, Any ideas ??

You can't. @selector() is a compiler directive which simply converts whatever is between the parentheses into an Objective-C selector -- you can't give it any other parameters. I think what you really want to do is to invoke the selector with parameters. The method you're trying to use only allows for a single parameter; there's no way to provide more than one.

Use a block or invocation. That doesn't mean that you don't have other options, though. You can use a block, as Rob describes, or you can create an instance of NSInvocation, add the necessary parameters, set the selector and target, and call -invoke.

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1  
Agreed. Lots of options here. If doSomeThing was doing a network request, I might also suggest he might also consider using a NSOperationQueue (where he can set maxConcurrentOperationCount so he doesn't submit too many concurrent requests if doing this on a really slow network) and which provides cancellation logic that GCD doesn't (so he don't risk getting this backlogged retrieving images for cells that may have long since scrolled out of view, yielding a really slow UX). –  Rob Jun 24 '13 at 15:53
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You can only send one parameter with performSelectorInBackground.

You'll have to do some re-architecturing of your code.

To pass one of the parameters you do:

[self performSelectInBackground:@selector(doSomething:) withObject:cell];
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