Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I store in a std::vector multiple shared_ptr each one with a pointer to a different type?

std::vector < ? > vec;
vec.push_back( make_shared<int>(3));
vec.push_back( make_shared<float>(3.14f));

Is there a base polymorphic class that can I use for that task without having to use compiler-specific stuff?

share|improve this question
    
How do you intend to get the type back of the stored class this way? Without a shared base class (the way I am used to seeing this done), you are not going to be able to tell what is stored if you mix floats and ints together. Some more background into what you are trying to accomplish would help as seeing these as shared pointers also has me scratching my head a bit. –  Michael Dorgan Jun 24 '13 at 15:23
    
Can you explain why you need this? –  user814628 Jun 24 '13 at 15:27
    
the vector does not need to be aware of the types, it is just a a place where to put "resources". I need at least 1 shared_ptr to keep resources alive, and the vector is here for that reason. Since there are several type of resources, I have to use several different shared_ptr... by the way I just solved the problem with a workaround. –  DarioOO Jun 24 '13 at 15:31
    
Just for a bit of variety, a non-boost solutions would be to use Variadic Templates, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variadic_template, which were a feature of C++11 –  Muckle_ewe Jun 24 '13 at 15:33
1  
@DarioOO: That's not what std::vector in itself is designed for. It is designed to be a container of T. Therefore, you either need to look for alternatives for std::vector, or reduce your problem to T entirely. –  phresnel Jun 24 '13 at 15:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are a few ways you can do this. I assume you want to store various native types, as you're using int and float.

  1. If your list of types is finite, use boost::variant. e.g.

    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<boost::variant<int, float>>>;
    
  2. If you want to store anything, use boost::any. e.g.

    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<boost::any>>;
    
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a particular reason why you’re leaving a space at the beginning of the template argument list but not at the end? –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 24 '13 at 15:32
    
Because I'm a newb at formatting my posts. :-p They weren't showing up as code blocks initially, and the only way to get the editor to not gobble up my inner types was to leave a space. –  bstamour Jun 24 '13 at 15:34
1  
Ah. :) Makes sense. I corrected the code blocks but I didn’t want to mess with your idiomatic code style, even though I found it atrocious. ;-) Glad to hear that we agree on that. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 24 '13 at 15:37

I you really need to do exactly this, use boost::any.

And use std::vector <std::shared_ptr<boost::any> > vec;

share|improve this answer

You can't mix types like that. You may want to have a look at boost::any

share|improve this answer

No, C++ does not have a single type from which everything is derived like many other languages do. int and float are native types, meaning they are fundamental to the language and not derived from anything else.

If you have the benefit of Boost, you can store any or variant types in your vector instead.

share|improve this answer

I need at least 1 shared_ptr to keep resources alive

For this to work, all the types you store must inherit from the same base class, which is the same type as the type contained in the shared pointer. Additionally, the base class must declare a virtual destructor (see this question).

Using boost::any will mean that every other shared_ptr to the objects also has to be a shared_ptr<bsst::any>, which is likely not what you want.

share|improve this answer

A possible way I figured to solve that is by doing the following

class ISomething{
    bool isAlive;
public:
    virtual bool alive(){ return isAlive;}
    virtual ~ISomething() {}
};

template <typename T>
class Something: public ISomething{
    std::shared_ptr<T> myRes;
public:    
};

std::vector<ISomething> myVec;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.